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Cpaulin (Cpaulin)
Member
Username: Cpaulin

Post Number: 21
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Friday, September 14, 2012 - 12:03 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Buy once, cry once. Get real, professionally installed traditional slate. Screws have no place in slate roofing systems.
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Omm (Omm)
Member
Username: Omm

Post Number: 27
Registered: 11-2010
Posted on Thursday, September 06, 2012 - 05:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

He is full of it. That system is harder to do then real slate. The valleys still have to be nailed in. I seen that system at a convention in Boston, you start from the top. Unless his price for shingles was so high he could pull it off? Mabe you can afford. Also the slate u buy for that system are saw cut. You have to pay extra for the frayed edge
Good luck!!!!
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 886
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Thursday, September 06, 2012 - 07:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

To "clarify", 10 squares is not 10 squares when you have all of the valleys to cut along with all of the copper to install and buy. What you are looking at there is about twice as much labor as a straight run. It sounds like what OMH said. the guy is going to just screw or nail down the Tru Slate without the hooking system. It may work, but then again, it may not. You are just getting a "wear surface" with the underlayment showing between the pieces. No head lap. Don't know what to recommend. The track system in the Tru slate kind of acts like a channel to carry away the water from between the slates when they are installed.
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Olde_mohawk_masonry__historic_restoration (Olde_mohawk_masonry__historic_restoration)
Senior Member
Username: Olde_mohawk_masonry__historic_restoration

Post Number: 173
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Thursday, September 06, 2012 - 06:58 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Clarification needed: Is the roofer saying he will install the Tru-Slate system with all the components (tracks and hooks and membrane)? Or are you saying he's going to screw the slates to the deck using the Tru-Slate method of headlap with the membrane between courses?
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Bachlewis (Bachlewis)
New member
Username: Bachlewis

Post Number: 3
Registered: 09-2012
Posted on Wednesday, September 05, 2012 - 10:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Many thanks for seasoned advice. Two related Qs. What should i expect for the cost of doing real slate roof over a 1000 sqft roof? And re repair, i have been told that slate repair always cost more that asphalt. This is probably true, but i suspect slate roof wont need as much repair to start with. Is that sensible?
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 883
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Tuesday, September 04, 2012 - 05:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Let's put it this way. The surface of the slate is going to replace the "surface" of the grand manors. Real slate will outlast Grand Manors. How long the underlayment lasts is anybody's guess. They haven't been making it for that long.

I would prefer you use slate "surface" to the Grand Manors. JMHO
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Bachlewis (Bachlewis)
New member
Username: Bachlewis

Post Number: 2
Registered: 09-2012
Posted on Tuesday, September 04, 2012 - 11:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thank you for your response. Here is a snapshot of the existing roof and the plan for the addition which is expected to connect to the house via a metal-roofed breezeway. The new roof is about 1000 sq ft. Again, We have been planning for a high-end shingle roof (Grand Manor) for a new addition we are building to our slate roofed house -- cannot afford genuine slate for the new addition. However, for the same price as the shingle roof (10k for a 1000 sq ft), our roofer has offered to install a slate roof in the "economy" method using the same underlayment as that of TruSlate. The slates get screwed with 4" lap (between 1st and second row slates), with Truslate membrane going between the slates. I would generally do not consider such a method, knowing the merits of genuine slate roofs. But not being able to afford that, I am tempted that this might not be a bad alternative to shingle. I appreciate any advise you might offer.

existing slate roof


new addition
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Olde_mohawk_masonry__historic_restoration (Olde_mohawk_masonry__historic_restoration)
Senior Member
Username: Olde_mohawk_masonry__historic_restoration

Post Number: 172
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Sunday, September 02, 2012 - 08:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

$10,000 isn't enough for 10 sq of slate on a brand new roof? In North Carolina? Seriously? What kind of slate do you have and what does the roof of the addition look like? The TruSlate/membrane offer sounds like a waste of money. Post a picture/drawing of the roof of your addition and I'll tell you what it should cost to slate it.
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Bachlewis (Bachlewis)
New member
Username: Bachlewis

Post Number: 1
Registered: 09-2012
Posted on Sunday, September 02, 2012 - 06:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Greetings. We have been planning for a high-end shingle roof (Grand Manor) for a new addition we are building to our slate roofed house -- cannot afford genuine slate for the new addition. However, for the same price as the shingle roof (10k for a 1000 sq ft), our roofer has offered to install a slate roof in the "economy" method using the same underlayment as that of TruSlate. The slates get screwed with 4" lap with Truslate membrane going between the slates. I would generally do not consider such a method, knowing the merits of genuine slate roofs. But not being able to afford that, I am tempted that this might not be a bad alternative to shingle. I appreciate any advise you might offer.
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 853
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Monday, July 23, 2012 - 05:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well said Branden!
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Branden_wilson (Branden_wilson)
Senior Member
Username: Branden_wilson

Post Number: 126
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, July 23, 2012 - 10:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

s3 slate, the most functional element of a slate roof (headlap) replaced with a piece of plastic, huh? why would anyone consider this?

REAL SLATER
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Homeowners (Homeowners)
New member
Username: Homeowners

Post Number: 1
Registered: 07-2012
Posted on Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - 11:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I love my True Slate roof ...is that what it's called. I'm in Seattle and we get a ton of rain and I never had any issue and it's a few years old. The manufacture was great, they came out and inspected our roof. I recommend that you get a contractor that is certified to install it and have the manufacture inspect it! That's how we found our contractor.
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Bkrsl8 (Bkrsl8)
New member
Username: Bkrsl8

Post Number: 1
Registered: 04-2010
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 06:37 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would like to introduce our company.Baker Slate Inc. owned by Eric & Sondra a family run business.we are in our 12th year.We produce S1 slate from the Vermont vein.We have a wide range of inventory.Our colors are Royal Purple,Varigiated Purple,Seagreen,and Mottled gray Black very similar to Vermont black.Due to the slow economy we are offering our slate to individuals at wholesale prices.You may have already used some of or slate as we sell to large distributers.If interested or any questions office #518-642-3808 Eric cell # 518-361-5040.
bakerslate@msn.com

Thank you very much.
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Jay Innomid
New member
Username: Innomid

Post Number: 2
Registered: 07-2007
Posted on Thursday, July 12, 2007 - 03:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Some time back I was sent a Tru Slate sample box with literature. The liner they use is a long strip of HDPE plastic 13inches high. However long it lasts, the company give a long warranty (which I have not read for specifics) What is interesting to me is that the system appears very fast to install, and both slates and liner can be easily and quickly replaced, as they both hang on hooks, very similar to the Italian method described in the The Slate Bible." When installed using their products, (steel batten and hooks, plastic liner, and slates, you end up with close to 12 x 12 slates on the roof, ie., essentially a roof of square slates.

Ttru Slate claim 179 mph wind lift resistance.

I still have to think all this stuff through, and would be happy if there were a discussion of it.

I have a ten square slate roof that is definately on its last legs, and have to decide on how to proceed.

I am also curious whether in order to get a warm attic it would be safe to spray foam insulation directly onto the decking from underneath (thereby preventing it from 'breathing' from underneath, but it seems to me if there will be no warm air coming at the roof from below, there would be no condensation problemn from the heated space.

I had initially thought to install new slates on battens over decking, but The Bible says that slates with less ventilation under them last longer.

Any thoughts???

Thanks
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 123
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 17, 2007 - 07:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

S1=best

S3=worst
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Austin Slater
New member
Username: Slatefan

Post Number: 1
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Thursday, May 17, 2007 - 05:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It doesn't look like the folks from TruSlate are hiding from the fact that they use a man-made liner. Is there a knock on that stuff?
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nelson rego
New member
Username: Nrego

Post Number: 4
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Monday, May 07, 2007 - 03:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What is the difference between S1, S2 and S3 slate ?
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Michael Joseph Bazikos
New member
Username: Mbazikos

Post Number: 3
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Monday, May 07, 2007 - 09:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Nelson, I checked out the TruSlate website out of curiousity and in their specifications was that the slate they provide was 'S3 or better'. As the labor will be the same, you would be better off buying the cheapest salvaged (American) slate, rather than inferior S3 slate, which will only last maybe 40 yrs. and will certainly weather badly very quickly.
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nelson rego
New member
Username: Nrego

Post Number: 3
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Monday, May 07, 2007 - 07:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I want to thank you all for your advise... I will definitely hire someone that will intalls the slate the traditional way with copper nails.
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Thomas Massie
Member
Username: Thomas

Post Number: 22
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 03, 2007 - 08:37 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ah yes, but sometimes Charlie, when grown ups say "forever," they mean, "a very long time."

-Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (2005)

Seriously, materials that could last "forever," if unexposed to light, can break down rather quickly when exposed to sunlight and weather.
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Slate Affair Inc.
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 80
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Thursday, May 03, 2007 - 05:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I belive that the system you are talking about also has less over lap from pc to pc. And this is why you need the plactic(I think that I see one with steel and hook too)to fill in all the cracks so in don't leak.
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nelson rego
New member
Username: Nrego

Post Number: 2
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Wednesday, May 02, 2007 - 03:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes the Tru Slate system relies on a plastic membrane that goes underneath the slate. I was told that this plastic membrane is the same membrane used to line landfills and that it will last forever...
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 109
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 02, 2007 - 12:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Doe the cheaper system rely on plastic to keep the water from penetrating the roof? If so, then you're buying a plastic roof with slate decoration.
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Slate Affair Inc.
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 76
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Wednesday, May 02, 2007 - 05:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hello Nelson,
I have never use that product but have been offer it by sale men as the new better way. I would not suggest going this way unless there was a weigth issuse. Also the system is new and has not been test with the true test of time!!
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nelson rego
New member
Username: Nrego

Post Number: 1
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Tuesday, May 01, 2007 - 02:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am in the process of hiring a roofing company to replace an old slate roof with new slate. I am leaning towards hiring a company that installs slate the traditional way with copper nails. Today another roofing company showed me a presentation on a system called TruSlate. It is easier to install and it will cost less. Does anyone in this board have any experience with TruSlate and do you recommend it over the traditional way of installing slate. Any info will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
Nelson Rego

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