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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1194
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Saturday, October 29, 2016 - 04:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Are you shopping for "clicks" on your site? Not here I am afraid!
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Annataylor (Annataylor)
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Posted on Saturday, October 29, 2016 - 05:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Roofing for a house is very important as it changes the whole look of your house. Recently my friend had Concrete Roof that Involve exactly what their name suggests, roof tiles made from concrete. He got full professional service from concrete contractors Frederick MD after I contacted them from their Official site :- http://www.capitalpavingconstruction.com/
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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1126
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Posted on Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 05:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

1917 house, so the slate is almost 100 years old. Can you post a few pictures? We could tell from them. I am sure there are members not too far from there you can talk to. If you can include a few pictures of the valley(s) and also a full picture of the house so we can see how high it is and other details that would also help. Information is Power!
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Slateknownothing (Slateknownothing)
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Posted on Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 05:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am new to this forum - please excuse my ignorance. I own a 1917 victorian style home in Lowell MA with a slate roof. I had it repaired a few times 18 plus years ago, and accepted a small leak in the valley of the attic dormer - pan on stairs to attic. I can't accept it anymore :) Leaking in 3 of 4 valleys. House has 2 dormers on the attic level. I was thinking of removing the slate but one roofer recommended repairing the valleys, saying I needed new flashing and 30 slates replaced. Quote was $7800. I am getting more quotes on repairing it but the problem is he said I had pennsylvania monson slate. I did some research and that doesn't make sense. Monson slate is from Maine. I also want to get solar installed in the next year before tax credits expire. How hard is it to put solar on slate? How can I tell what type of slate I have? Any advice or recommendations for slate guys in the Lowell area? Thanks in advance
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Slate Affair Inc.
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Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 319
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Thursday, December 18, 2008 - 06:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would say because of all the cutting and that you got a china slate, you would end up needing more then the area that need to be slated. If you get to do other slate roofs I would get samples and find out were they can from. I know of company's that have had to take off china's slate because of change in color and brakeage.
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Eric Braymer
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Username: Braymer

Post Number: 41
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Wednesday, December 17, 2008 - 02:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If I figured this right, a 3 3/4 inch headlap would increase your slates needed to 177.61 per square (about 7-8 more per square). The actual roof area of the dormers should also be included in the area if they are not. Also include 1 inch on all gable edges and 1 1/2 inch on all drip edges into your roof area. Hope this helps, Sir.
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Bob Lee
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Username: Bob

Post Number: 4
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Wednesday, December 17, 2008 - 11:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Slate is from China. Latest shipment did not have excessive breakage and cut well.
Gables are triangular shapes that project from the main roof...like gable (not shed) dormers, but for rooms on the main floor of a 1-1/2 story house, not just upstairs bedroom windows. This means there's a lot of valleys that require cut tiles. 85 squares is actual roof area. Headlap is 3.75 inches.
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Eric Braymer
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Username: Braymer

Post Number: 39
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Wednesday, December 17, 2008 - 08:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By "Gable" do you mean - "The generally triangular section of wall at the end of a pitched roof, occupying the space between the two slopes of the roof". Or are these "dormers"? Is the 85 squares the actual roof area or bldg footprint.
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Slate Affair Inc.
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Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 317
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Posted on Wednesday, December 17, 2008 - 05:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There is the slate from?
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Bob Lee
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Posted on Tuesday, December 16, 2008 - 04:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We've used about 10,000 pieces so far and we're about 55% done. Would the gables cause a significant increase? I think we also lost about 500 pieces due to shipping damage.
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Eric Braymer
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Username: Braymer

Post Number: 37
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Posted on Tuesday, December 16, 2008 - 02:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well 500 mm is about 20 inches, and 250 mm is about 10 inches. With a standard 3 inch headlap on a 20x10 inch slate, 170 pieces of slate are needed per square (square = 10x10 ft area). For 85 squares, thats 14,450 - how many did he order ? . (the roofer could have possibly used more of a headlap for a lower slope or something which would use up more slates per sq.).
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Bob Lee
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Posted on Tuesday, December 16, 2008 - 11:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Eric, I was hoping for guidance to allow me to calculate the amount myself. However, the slate pieces are 500 x 250 mm, there are four gables, plus the garage is set as an "L" from the rest of the house and total area is about 85 squares.
Thanks.
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Eric Braymer
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Username: Braymer

Post Number: 36
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Posted on Tuesday, December 16, 2008 - 11:25 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bob, roof dimensions and description of details (any dormers ?) , slate sizes (important), and photographs would help answer better.
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Bob Lee
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Posted on Tuesday, December 16, 2008 - 10:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My roof is in process of installation now. My architect did not order enough material and we need to place another order. How do you estimate the amount of slate required? How do you allow for the detailing on the roof? Is there something my installer may be doing that has increased the amount of slate used?
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Slate Affair Inc.
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Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 312
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Tuesday, December 09, 2008 - 06:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Can you post a picture. I have a feeling there some tar of some kind on your roof.
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John Collins
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Username: John_c

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Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Monday, December 08, 2008 - 12:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I recently had damage done to my slate roof due to a wind storm and items fying around. When the insurance inspector came out they said tel could tell that alot of the damage was old because of the coating placed on the slate. Does this make sense? How can you tell how old a break is to a piece of slate?
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Kurtis Hord
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Username: Kwhord

Post Number: 61
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Monday, July 07, 2008 - 08:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Toni, you should post a new topic.
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toni rambo
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Username: Amalways

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Registered: 07-2008
Posted on Monday, July 07, 2008 - 08:48 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

hello everyone i am brand new to thr forum i have a very small roof that i want to put old 22x18 pieces of slate on...here is my question.
I am hoping you can help me..I have a very small porch roof..approx 8’ by 5’..it currently has tan/brown shingles that are in great shape there are just brown…the rest of my house has the natural gray that’s a slate color..i have an old shed in my yard near the porch that has a slate roof and I love it.

I have some old slate laying around(22by12) that I want to put overtop of these tan or brown shingles..can I just put them overtop of the shingles..

Will the existing holes if any that are in the slate cause any issues if I put the slate overtop of the shingles.

I didn’t want to call roofer for the area is so small and I can do it myself I just don’t want any unnecessary leaks and i also didnt want to make it into a huge project.

thanks for any help
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David Spradlin
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Username: David_spradlin

Post Number: 12
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Friday, February 01, 2008 - 10:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Vertical 2x6's shouldn't be a problem. Theres examples of vertical sheeting in the SRB on conical roofs. We're in California, and there are counties that require us to install a fire barrier under wood shakes/shingles (min. granulated #90) in order to get the Class A fire rating required in those counties, but I've never had to use it under slate or tile. Your building inspector should be able to tell you what your local codes require. I'd argue it if they do call for it, because that slates all the fire barrier should need.
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Slate Affair Inc.
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Username: Slate_man

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Posted on Friday, February 01, 2008 - 04:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Why would you have run the deck that way?

Don't use the plywood, use the 2x6 for the horizontal decking.

As far as venting, you should add vertical strapping 16 in oc for venting it.

You don't have to put felt on at all, unless you want the house to water-resistent why installing the slate.
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Briony Penn
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Posted on Thursday, January 31, 2008 - 06:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Help! I have acquired some historic slate (it came off Fort Victoria that was salvaged by my grandfather) and I will be using it on my house that I am building. I need some quick advice from some slaters as we have run into a design problem midway with decking ventilation etc. (they want us to use ply and we would prefer to have 2 by 6 decking with felt) that the building inspector's have pointed out. It would mean that we would have lay the decking down vertically instead of horizontally. Would that be a problem. Also do you have to add those toxic fire retardant stuff to the felt? There's no help out here on the west coast and we badly need some advice!! Willing to pay!!
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Patricia Anton
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Username: Tricia

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Registered: 11-2007
Posted on Thursday, November 29, 2007 - 04:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Mansard Roof. We have a couple of 19th. century hotels that have mansard roofs. We have stripped off the shingle down to the 1" planking. We have "the bible" and are following advice and using 30 lb felt. I have been asked to consider putting tybek on the roof after the felt and before the slate. The Mansard roof forms the walls of the rooms, we are concerned about insulation as the building faces a Lake in a ski area. Any input would be appreciated
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chris
Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2001 - 11:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am a 26 year old carpenter that started working for myself 9 months ago. I have 10 years of experience in residential construction, mostly in framing, roofing, and siding. I live in southern NH. My work consists mostly of new construction; shingle roofs. My hired help{and best friend} got me the Slate roof bible for Christmas because I had expressed interest in slating and southern NH has literally thousands of slate roofs. I would like to get away from shingle roofs and do more restoration work. I charge $45 per square for shingles plus extras. That is the going rate in this area. Could someone please tell me what to charge for slate repair and/or restoration? How about fair prices for slate, i.e., flea markets, homeowners, etc.? Any other advice would be greatly appreciated.
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nelsonlarry
Posted on Saturday, March 17, 2001 - 03:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How do we keep birds out of the eaves of a tile roof?
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Cripe
Posted on Saturday, July 21, 2001 - 06:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is is okay to walk on a slate roof? Someone told us that contractors could damage the roof if they walk on it. If you cannot walk on it, how do you repair it? Also, do you need to have moss removed from a slate roof?
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Dave Snyder
Posted on Sunday, July 22, 2001 - 02:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Cripe gennerally no slate roof should be walked on. There are tools available for navigating around slate roofs. Usually the most common will be a hook that attaches to a ladder. This hook can be slid up the roof and sets over the ridge then you are able to walk up the ladder. On a hip roof this may not be of help. You then may use roof jacks that are specifically designed larger based for slate roofs as well. You would want to beware of anyone that does not utilize these tools in their roofing activity with slate roofing. You more than likely will be paying for a lot more damage than you began with. I would recommend that you look into this before allowing anyoe on that roof or putting ladders up to your eve slates as well. Keep your messages coming here to Joe's message board and you will get the correct answers. Put your money away and get some facts about slate experience then you may be fortunate enough to find a good slate roofer or become one for yourself. Thanks Dave Snyder / www.slateandcopper.com
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luke meadors
Posted on Saturday, October 27, 2001 - 10:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Looking for general information about slate roofs. Is there any value in an old slate roof? Specifically, if one is demolishing an old building, with a slate roof, is the slate worth salvaging as far as resale value? General guidelines, to start with,is what I am looking for. I am on the board of a charitable organization that is in possession of such a building and we are trying to decide what to do with the building, or the materials, if we should demolish it. Any help is appreciated.
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Jim Germond
Posted on Monday, October 29, 2001 - 09:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Luke,
A number of variables influence the hypothetical value of a salvaged slate roof:

- Is the slate solid enough to warrant careful removal? If it is soft-vein Pennsylvania it may well be too crumbly to be reusable. Even if it is Vermont/New York slate, there are no guarantees about its present condition. I have seen salvaged New York Red slate that fell apart in your hands. I have seen a Vermont Sea Green roof with 1/2" to 1" slates that were only 75 years old that were falling apart.

- If the slate has salvage value, how will you remove it? If you can strip the roof yourself without being killed or maimed you will maximize the potential profit. My experience suggests the following loose guidelines:

If someone else removes and takes the slate, they might be willing to pay you $0 to $50 per square. If you remove it and get it to the ground it may be worth $50 to $100 per square "for what's good."
If you remove it, get it to the ground and sort out the junk, you may be able to wholesale it for $200 per square. If you can remove it, sort it and inventory the stone until a roofer or homeowner or Artist/Craftsperson needs it, you may be able to sell it for $300 per square.

The slate size, color and origin, difficulties or ease of removal and transportation will influence the value. If you want to email me some photos and/or send me a sample I will give you my opinion

Best Regards,
Jim Germond
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Monty Jones
Posted on Wednesday, December 05, 2001 - 09:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am planning to use slate roofing on a small sunroom addition (2 1/2 square). I have an acquaintance who has 3 square of unused gray slate for sale. These shingles are new, but have been stored inside around 50 years. He wants $200 per square, which sounds fair, but the shingles are only 6"X10". Aside from a lot of extra nailing, are there reasons not to use such a small dimension?

Sincerely, Monty Jones
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admin
Posted on Thursday, December 06, 2001 - 12:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You can buy new slate that size for probably less money. What do you mean by gray slate? Gray PA slate that size and age is not worth it. Gray VT slate (or VA slate) is better quality at 50 years but, as I said, I have seen it brand new at the quarry (US Quarried Slate Co.) for $165/square in 6x12 inch size. That was a few years ago, but it's worth checking into.

I found some old PA slate in a barn that was at least 50 years old - stored on edge as it should have been - never used, in fact, no nail holes. It was turning soft already, despite the fact that it had never seen any weather. It's a chemical sort of deterioration with that type of slate, so age is a red flag.
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tmaher
Posted on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 09:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My sixty year old house has a slate roof. At the ridge under the (mostly) abutting slates, there appears to be an inch thick coating of black stuff that looks like very stiff tar but it is cracking and the underlying ridge beams are visible in a few places and, I'm sure, getting wet in others. I'm considering pulling off the two top courses and putting in a ridge vent. But is there some kind of caulking I can use immediately? (There are no interior signs of leaks yet).
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Joe
Posted on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 09:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Better to replace the top row(s) of slates (usually only the top or "cap" slates need replaced) and then either install a slate ridge or new copper ridge. Apparently either the top row(s) of slates were installed incorrectly or the ridge was installed incorrectly, or a neanderthal just got wild with a bucket of tar along the ridge. It can all be cleaned up and put in proper order. I don't recommend aluminum ridge vents. They're made for asphalt shingle roofs, not slate. Don't waste your money.
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Walter Musson
Posted on Monday, January 07, 2002 - 08:43 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

tmaher,
Ijust finished a ridge like you talked about,this fall.The owner wanted to finish the attic space for an art studio and wanted to vent the roof.This roof had ridge metal on it.I removed the metal and the top two courses of slates.I cut back the sheathing boards 1.5" and then re-installed the slates after cutting down their length to appropriate size.I then installed Cobra Vent over the ridge and fabricated 20 oz. copper tocover the vent then secured it with 2.5" brass screws between every third slate up from the bottom edge of the copper an inch and a half.
Now they have a fully functioning vented ridge.
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Anonymous
Posted on Sunday, February 10, 2002 - 05:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We have a house built in 1926 with an asbestos roof. We have owned the home since 1978. The roof has a 45% angle & the apex was tarred once since we lived here. No apparent leaks tho the team that came around did walk on the roof, mostly on the ridge. (We didn't know at the time not to let them.) We have always had moss growing here and there and thought it attractive. A young carpenter told us it would damage the roof but I believe he thought the roof was made of wood shingles. Does anyone know if moss will damage the roof? Or are WE now the authority, since our roof is now 76 yrs. old!
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Monday, February 11, 2002 - 10:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't think moss is a problem on asbestos shingle roofs.
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Walter
Posted on Monday, February 11, 2002 - 02:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Moss is indicative of a softening of the asbestos shingle over time, allowing the moss to take hold and grow.This means the roof is in the second half of it's life expectancy.80 to 100 years is about all you can expect from those tiles.
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Lawrence
Posted on Saturday, August 03, 2002 - 09:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just purchased a home in long Island NY that was built in 1940; it has a vermont slate roof; the flashing is cooper but looks like it needs to be replaced (looks rusted); some of the slates are cracked and broken. I should also add that I think I have had a neanderthal place tar in certain areas, inlcuding all along the crest of the roof...is using tar ever proper?
Should I replace flashing if it dosen't leak.
I am ordering the bible to educate myself.
Thanks

I was going to call a roofer, have new flashing installed, replace the cracked slates and have it power washed (black mold on one side of roof).
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A. Inman
Posted on Saturday, August 03, 2002 - 11:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Lawrence, copper doesn't rust, it last as long as you want it to. That's why copper is used with slate. As for the tar, I don't ever use it on a slate roof. And I wouldn't replace the flashing unless you are going for the new look or if it is some other metal besides copper or stainless steel. I don't think I would let someone pressure my roof either. They would have to be experienced and my roof would have to be young(the older the slate, the more brittle it will become).
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A. Inman
Posted on Saturday, August 03, 2002 - 11:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

pressure wash^
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Lawrence
Posted on Sunday, August 04, 2002 - 08:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How do you clean a slate roof then, and how would you know if someone is experienced in powerwashing older slate?

I have taken another look at the flashing and it is clear that it is a combination green and brown as decribed--my only though is could it be copper plated flashing?
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Lawrence
Posted on Sunday, August 04, 2002 - 08:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A smart man learns from his mistakes; a wise man learns from other peoples mistakes.
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Joe
Posted on Monday, August 05, 2002 - 10:42 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Aging copper will be green and brown, eventually turning entirely green. You have to examine the copper closely for holes. If there are holes, then replace it. If not, consider painting it with "tinner's green" to preserve it.

Roof cement (tar) should not be visible anywhere on a slate roof.
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Lawrence
Posted on Wednesday, August 07, 2002 - 07:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks joe
So it sounds like I have to replace quite a no. of tiles if I want to get rid of the tar.

As for the cooper, that was good advice.

I am still curious how I should clean the roof
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Tim Dittmar
Posted on Wednesday, August 07, 2002 - 08:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Lawrence- if power washing is done with high tip pressure/s(pounds per sq inch) on soft materials, often a gouging and uneven cleaning effect is produced(particularly true of power washing older sundecks)- your slate roof is probably relatively clean from ablation(flaking) of the Vermont slates and being washed with mildly acidic rain- the "black mold" is alive(probably) and grows, spreads, and probably can only be removed with herbicides, fungicides?, or a solution of bleach and water(3 parts water to one bleach- or so)that will kill the growths(and they fall off?) for a period of time until they grow back because of favorable conditions(less than direct sun, moisture, and the presence of nutrients)- it may be worthwhile to apply a "cide" to this visual problem of yours but I'd advise against the power washing- there's not a clear requirement to do that to your roof and the risk/s of collateral visual, etc, damage are high- it could be that cleaning up the tar(scraping it off otherwise good slates) and allowing the sun to "cook" off the less visible remains would do but I suppose the tar wouldn't be there if the roof hadn't been leaking for some reason- I'd concentrate on the physical repairs first and when the "patient" stabilizes, consider the esthetic aspects next.
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Lawrence
Posted on Saturday, August 10, 2002 - 12:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tim
Thank you for your analysis.

I have not had a problem with leaking; I have had heavy rain; but, I have yet to weather a snow storm. Although, it concerns me that you believe I may have had a problem with leaks and that is why the tar is present. If a proper repair was done, because there was leaking---should it have been done without the tar?

You say you would concentrate on the physical repairs first. That would be replacing some cracked and loose slates; I do plan to do that but, why should I not get it all done (the esthetic work also) while the roofer is present.

What is a "cide"
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Tim Dittmar
Posted on Saturday, August 10, 2002 - 02:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Lawrence, you're certainly welcome- I've read back through the dialogue that followed your first query- there's been some agreement among us concerning the use of tar, the probable type of flashing(and what should concern you in maintenance terms, etc.), whether or not to P-wash, the value of correct knowledge and proper goal-setting, prioritizing of specfic findings from a close look at the roof, etc. A constant theme at this site is the frequency of regrettably poor-quality slate work- you apparently have some as well- all this often leads to cautionary advice given to motivated roof owners such as yourself. Translation: "Don't enter the deep end of the "repair pool" on your first time out or with "roofers" you may have cause to be unsure of". Unloading your whole perceived roof problem onto someone/anyone all at one time is probably unwise- take a step or two at the time and continue to re-evaluate as you go- a great slater may have little or no interest in P-washing your roof(even if he thinks it's a good idea)- getting in a hurry is a big mistake in much of commerce- you don't have any leaks? Have some work done to improve appearance and then allow it to rain a few times to more effectively gauge whom you've engaged to pursue your goals- there won't be a single session of work on your roof- it's already 60 years old. You know- a "cide" is just shorthand for partially-identified item/s referred to earlier.... Space is limited here(for us all)- I'm in the NC part of the directory if you have ...../s
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Dana
Posted on Saturday, September 07, 2002 - 06:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am considering (Seriously) buying a 1945 home with a slate roof. People have told me that the weight of the slate roof causes continuous cracking in the plaster walls. True? If so, would drywall crack also? The house needs tons of work, but has tons of character. The roof appears to be in great shape, don't know what type, it appears black and green (from the ground), but there are 2-3 missing slates.
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Walter Musson
Posted on Sunday, September 08, 2002 - 10:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

the weight of the slate wouldn't cause the cracking you mention,only a structural problem lower in the building.If the house was built to code it has a live and dead load of 50 pounds or more per square foot of roof.Slate only adds 5 to 6 pounds over asphalt roofing.
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Chris Smith
Posted on Thursday, September 12, 2002 - 05:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am about to move into a slate roof house in Stirling Scotland, built in 1928 with Scottish Slate. Unforunately the slate is stained from work carried out on the roof over the yrs including the insertion of dormer windows. I would like to apply some form of wash or water based paint to make a uniform colour. is this possible. I note the comment on power wash. Also re the above comments. Scottish slater seem to walk quite happily on roofs and on tall buildings will access the roof thru a sky lite and then work on the roof attached to a rope! I have also been told that scottish slate has a resonance similar to crystal when tapped.
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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, September 17, 2002 - 07:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Our company is engaged in an addition to a house that has a slate roof on the existing areas.

We installed ice and weather guard under the entire addition as added protection from water
infiltration. We installed the slate with copper nails. We added a copper ridge cap that laps over the top row of slate. There are NO CAPS available for the slate we used. We are going to use the slate as a cap but do not want to use nails that would penetrate the copper. We would like to use GEOCEL to in essence glue these cap in place.

The manufacture says this product will hold in essence for ever.. Your thoughts....
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admin
Posted on Wednesday, September 18, 2002 - 10:00 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Why not leave the copper exposed or just use slate ridge with no copper?
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Chris Smith
Posted on Monday, September 23, 2002 - 12:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for your helpful comments.
Chris Smith.
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Tim Dittmar
Posted on Monday, September 23, 2002 - 10:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Chris- I'm not sure anyone took special time for your query but it's nice to receive your thanks! I got the "bright" idea to recolor my fiberglass shingle roof(you know that the granules are often pulverized slate or another naturally colored mineral?) because the tan blend was, for my taste, a poor choice made by the former owners that doesn't work well with the red brick and black shutters-white clapboards. I thought some thinned out paint(50-50 or weaker?) might act as a stain to give a kinder/darker shade- anything could be looked on as likely an improvement- did two test spots on a spare/not installed shingle and left it out in the sun on the walkway- one spot o'paint(black) and another of thinned out asphalt cement(brownish)- the paint(oil-base) has faded rapidly in the intervening 6 or so months but the asphalt has done slightly better but all in all- decidedly so far- not a viable concept. You've not been overly specfic about what has caught your eye on your roof and how much/widespread there/it is- perform experiments first(like the one I described with a single shingle)? Latex/waterbase paint dries rapidly and may often fail to adhere well for that reason and for what it is applied over. Certain var.'s of slate are well known to resist gluing/bonding in certain architectural applications(esp. vertical mode) Please don't "bomb" your roof until you're satisfied the risk/s is/are worth taking- more comprehensive input from you may generate a better focus on advice. Stay in touch- we'll try to help!
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Chris Smith
Posted on Wednesday, September 25, 2002 - 12:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tim,
thanks for your comments. Yes I am hesitant to apply anything to the slate roof that would make permanent changes. It does look rather odd with significant staining underneath the velux windows streaming down the roof. Also staining from the flashing in places. As we haven't moved into the house I have not been able to get up close. I will let you know what transpires.
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admin
Posted on Wednesday, September 25, 2002 - 12:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Regarding the ridge scenario again, I had stated: Why not leave the copper exposed or just use slate ridge with no copper?

Another approach would have been to use a slate ridge with copper step flashing.
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Anonymous
Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 - 12:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am a home owner and new to slate roofing. I need to replace about 30 roof slates. The existing slates are 12 x 18. My supply of used replacement slates are 121/4 x 20. So I need to do a fair amount of trimming.
My question is whether a masonry blade on a power saw, a powered tile saw, or some other tool would work better or quicker than a manual slate cutter. I do not care whether the power saw would result in a squared edge rather than a crumbled edge to match the existing slates, since I dont think that detail will be noticed from the ground. Any suggestions on the best alternatives to using a manual slate cutter would be appreciated. By the way, I have not yet acquired a slate cutter, so I do not know how quick and easy or slow and difficult it is to use. If its quick and easy, I suppose I should just buy one rather than buying the power tools.
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admin
Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 - 02:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You should buy a hand operated slate cutter. Power cutters are much more dangerous, make dust, expensive, and leave a square edge. Hand cutters are easy to operate, can be carried up on the roof and don't need to be plugged in (and you don't have to worry about cutting your fingers off with them like with a diamond blade).

We sell the Stortz cutter online for $85 at http://jenkinsslate.com/store_cutters.html
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tersh
Posted on Saturday, July 19, 2003 - 07:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've just looked at someone's slate ridge above the dormer; there is no cap over it; that makes me uneasy; there must be a quarter inch gap between the slates in some places; she says she "thought was was just taken care of" any advice on how a ridge should look for for weather tightness?
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steve machel
Posted on Saturday, July 19, 2003 - 02:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

to all concerned: the best way to remove tar from slate or copper roofs, is to buy enough WD40 {it comes in gallon containers}. First remove most of the tar with a putty knife and then spray or soak the area and wipe off.
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Barry Smith
Posted on Monday, July 21, 2003 - 10:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tersh, The ridge slates with a gap of a 1/4 inch can be caulked with 5o yr silicon or you can put metal ridge cap right over them. All the water runs away from the crack, so it isn't a big leak point anyway.
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Jerry Kitchens
Posted on Monday, July 21, 2003 - 09:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Mr.Jenkins,
I have posted here before about the roof on my 75 year old house which has proven to be Pa gray. It needs to be replaced. I was going to use the same slate since I am in the middle of an addition but it is not available in the time frame they need it in. They have what they call peach bottom slate salvaged from some military buildings which they state is about 60 years old. I have read that this is a very good slate. They have offered to use this slate for the project for $300 a square which is what they were going to charge me for PA gray. Is this a good deal? How can I be sure it is peach bottom? I live in Birmingham, Al. not alot of slate except in my neighborhood.
Thanks,
Jerry
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admin
Posted on Tuesday, July 22, 2003 - 10:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have seen the Peach Bottom and Buckingham slate coming off those buildings and it is very good slate. I think it's a pretty good deal at $300/square.

Joe Jenkins
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Chris Gardner
Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - 12:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hello there, I am a new 'reader' to this site and I think it is great. Could you tell me if the slaters tools such as the cutters and ladder jacks are available through outlets in the UK, for some reason I can't find such items through the normal search engines!
Many thanks
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Thursday, August 14, 2003 - 08:50 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Most of the tools on this web site [http://www.jenkinsslate.com/store_tools.html] are not available at outlets in Europe. The Estwing hammers *are* sold in Europe.
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Anonymous
Posted on Thursday, August 14, 2003 - 09:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

CHRIS IF YOU HAVE GOOGLE .COM AS A SEARCH ENGINE TYPE IN -SLATE TOOLS- OR- ROOF SLATE- OR- SLATE CUTTER- THERE ARE MANY SUPPLIERS IN THE UK.
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Tuesday, September 09, 2003 - 10:33 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just noticed that the "Gardens Alive" catalog includes "Moss Aside" which is described as a quick and natural moss killer that is suitable for use on roofs - the active ingredient being a soap-based herbicide.

http://www.gardensalive.com
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gene whiting
Posted on Sunday, October 05, 2003 - 03:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am working in east TN and know that slate was mined in Tellico plans. how does one know what that slate looks like and how hard is it?
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Tuesday, October 07, 2003 - 10:00 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

According to the Slate Roof Bible, 1st edition, page 43, the slate from Tellico Plains was purplish, greenish, and black hard slate. That's the only information published about that area that I am aware of. I have never seen the slate. If you can find an old quarry, check in the immediate area for any old slate roofs. That would be your best chance of finding and identifying roof slate from that area. However, although slate may have been available in that area, whether it was commercially mined is one thing, whether it was made into roofing slate at all is another. You could be on a wild goose chase.
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kk
Posted on Friday, October 17, 2003 - 10:02 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

can sombody please explain to me why fractures appear in the slate after,the slate has been installed for some time
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Friday, October 17, 2003 - 11:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How long after installation? A year? A century? One of the problems with newer slate roof installations is that a lot of the roofers nowadays spend most of their time stapling asphalt shingles to plywood roof decks and they don't have enough experience installing slate roofs. They walk on the roofs or otherwise damage them during installation and then some of the slates will fracture and fall apart in the first ten years or so. We have seen as many as 100 slates, good quality slates, break in the first ten years, installed by roofing contractors who were careless during the installation and who will not answer phone calls 10 years later (therefore, the roof owners call us and we have to go repair the roofs).

A properly installed slate roof should show very little if any breakage of slates after installation.
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Harry Lawson
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2004 - 10:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My uncle plans to put slate tiles on an asbestos floor in his balcony. Any idea what type of bonding material he should use? Thanks.
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Anonymous
Posted on Thursday, May 20, 2004 - 03:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

will copper ridge caps act as mildew control for
the slates below? I had heard that zinc does...
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admin
Posted on Friday, May 21, 2004 - 09:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Copper oxide is a fungicide and mildew killer. It will help with mildew control, but there are other factors that will outweigh the benefits of copper ridge. Tree overhang and leaf fall, for example, will greatly accelerate the amount of moss and mildew on a roof, copper or no copper.
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Anonymous
Posted on Wednesday, July 07, 2004 - 11:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I live in Toronto canada and have seen some beautiful old slate roofs here. I have purchased the slate bible and have enjoyed immensely. I am looking at the viabilty of doing some slate roofs profssionally and would apprceciate any adivce.
thanks
S. Stevens
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admin
Posted on Thursday, July 08, 2004 - 11:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There is a need everywhere for qualified slate roof restoration professionals as well as competent slate roof installers. I will be establishing a training center to train people in these skills in 2005. We are now working toward putting up a building that we can use for these (and other slate roof business) purposes here in western PA (the building shell is going up this month, but will be finished over the winter 2004-2005). It will be somehow associated with the Slate Roofing Contractors Association of North America. I will be sure to keep everyone posted (informed) about this as it develops.

Joe Jenkins
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scott stevens
Posted on Sunday, July 11, 2004 - 11:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Joe
I look forward to hearing more about this.

Scott
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scott stevens
Posted on Saturday, July 17, 2004 - 12:37 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Joe:
I was wondering if you have made any videos of any of your slate roofing jobs. This would be a great aid to those interested in learning more about the craft.
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admin
Posted on Saturday, July 17, 2004 - 10:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We have not made any videos yet, but we intend to.
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Anonymous
Posted on Thursday, July 22, 2004 - 06:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We bought a home that was built in 1886 in Northern Ohio. The slate is green/grey in looks. We are missing some slates and have 3 leaks. The old owners put tar on to stop leaks we guess. The house is 4 stories and the one leak is in the top tourent (not sure of spelling:)
Our home owners insurance says all the tar must come off and missing slates replaced. Help.. I am buying your book from barnes and noble but, not sure if it mentions how to get tar off.
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Anonymous
Posted on Thursday, July 22, 2004 - 09:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Scrape off as much of the tar as you can with a good stiff putty knife or sharp edged wonder bar,then either use bug & tar remover(automobile type) or a gasoline soaked rag -- Or replace all the slate that have tar on them.
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Kathy Aycock
Posted on Monday, September 13, 2004 - 10:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How do you properly clean a slate roof? I realize that no one should be on the slate at any time; however, what can you use to clean it without damaging the slate? This home is a two story house in Texarkana, Texas. Please advise and thanks!
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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, October 12, 2004 - 12:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dear Joe,

I came across your website and learned many interesting things about slate roofs. We are currently in the process of buying a house in upstate NY (Albany area). Its a 66 year old house with a slate roof - so it must be the original roof. We are having a building inspection done in a few days, which is when we will get a (hopefully) professional opinion on the state of the roof. Is there anything in particular that we should look for at inspection time? Based on the age of the house and its location, is there some liklihood of the slate being of any particular type? Regarding home insurance, the companies I talked to seemed very concerned that this is an "old" roof and did not seem to understand that if its a slate roof, the definition of "old" is quite different that for asphalt. Is this a common complaint? Thanks very much for any input!

-vidya
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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, October 12, 2004 - 03:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

First, have a true prfessional slate roofer do the inspection-not just a general home inspector, as many of them do not understand slate roofs. Most inspectors and insurance company people do not understand slate roofs very well therefore they are almost always ready to advice tear off-DON'T LISTEN TO THEM, have a slate roofer look at it. Next due to the location I'd say you have a Vermont slate-slate roof. And if that is the case you have 50-100 years of life left-atleast. Yes there is things to look for flashings, tarred and silaconed if it is it has a problem, chimney flashing same as above, valleys look for same as above. Also look for broken slate, nailed thru slate, tarred in and/or silaconed slate- all are problems. As for your insurance company saying it's old, a 100 year old slate roof is brand new compaired to a 30yr. asphalt roof. You'll replace a new 30 yr. asphalt roof 3-5 times before the current 100yr. old slate roof has to be replaced. Leave a call back # or e-mail address and some professional slate roofers will respond to you and maybe you can get one to inspect your slate roof. slate on!
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Warren Snead
Posted on Thursday, November 18, 2004 - 09:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am doing an addition on my 70-year-old house. I currently have Buckingham slate and will be using some of my slate on the addition(salvaged from a demolished porch at my house). The roofer has proposed using Vermont black on the remaining areas due to the difficulty and expense of getting matching Buckingham slate. What are the differences in compostion and aging/wear between the two?
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admin
Posted on Thursday, November 18, 2004 - 10:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Buckingham lasts longer. You can get salvaged Buckingham as easily as Vermont black. Check the "sources of used slate" page on this web site at http://www.jenkinsslate.com/usedslate.htm
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jchan
Posted on Friday, November 19, 2004 - 08:16 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We have large quantities of salvaged Buckingham in stock. You can see us online at www.durableslate.com or call (800) 666-7445
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wrickard
Posted on Monday, December 27, 2004 - 10:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We bought a 1939 home in Mt. Lebanon, PA this summer. There did not seem to be any problems this fall with the attic and water, however now I can see that the nails that have come through the boards are covered with thick frost. The attic now has a damp smell. Is this a common thing with a slate roof, or do we have a huge issue here? I am extremely worried about this, any suggestions would be wonderful. W.
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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 06:11 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You have a condesation problem-You have warm air filtering into your attic and making contact with the cold metal nails & wood substrate.Either need to stop the flow of warm air into the space or ventilate the space to reduce the temperature of the warm air before it comes into contact with the colder surfaces.Try to locate warm air leakage and seal with insulation,caulking,foam ect. Then maybe add some ventilation,
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 12:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It is a common thing with slate roofs, so I wouldn't get an ulcer over it.
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Peter
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 05:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi wrickard,

I wouldn't get an ulcer over it either, then it's not my house.

You have a problem with condensation, that is warm air entering the attic / roof space and meeting the cold surface of the roof.

To solve the problem, you will need to make sure the roof space is properly vented and have sufficient insulation to prevent the heat escaping into the roof space.

Frost on nails can cause the nails to rust and your slates start sliding off the roof, admittedly that does take time.

Another side effect is the frost (another form of water) can cause the roof timbers to rot.

The damp smell can be a warning sign that should be heeded, it can lead to wet / dry rot if allowed to continue unchecked.

Feel free to contact me if you require further information.

Kind Regards,

Peter Crawley, M.I.o.R.

www.crawleyroofing.com
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wrickard
Posted on Tuesday, January 11, 2005 - 10:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Happy New Year to all. Thanks for your orginal response. It made Christmas stress free. However as I went to put away the tree I noticed that EVERY nail tip that has come through the boards is dripping just slightly. How do I fix this short of getting a new roof? It has been raining for several days. Is this normal with a slate roof?

Thanks for your time.
Windelin Rickard
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Tony EriePA
Posted on Wednesday, January 12, 2005 - 02:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

An untried possibility would be to dip the nail tips (when dry) into the nozzle of 50-yr silicone caulk which would then coat them with a less-temperature-transmissive material and prevent the frosting and dripping? It doesn't fix the moisture in the attic problem though. I did that on some copper nails this autumn as I was tired of puncturing my head on a low part of the roof. They're now the ones that are drip free on those days when frost attaches ... or maybe I really did damage some grey cells, hmmmm
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Walter Musson
Posted on Wednesday, January 12, 2005 - 02:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hopefully the slight dripping is the frost melt,since you say it's warm enough to rain now.I don't believe that every nail could be leaking slighly from the rain penetrating the roof.
You really do need to address the insulation and ventilation issues that were discussed earlier.
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admin
Posted on Wednesday, January 12, 2005 - 11:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You have a condensation problem while will only be solved by keeping warm air out of the attic space (or by letting cold, ambient air in).

You can also insulate between your rafters and then put up a vapor barrier (sheet of plastic) interior to the insulation. That will also solve the problem.
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wrickard
Posted on Sunday, January 16, 2005 - 08:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thank you Tony, Walter and Admin for your reply. I removed a ceiling fan from our bathroom that had been vented incorrectly and rigged up a plug until my husband and I can get a new one and have it vented out the roof. I also put down more insulation in that area.

Is there a fan system that I can run all year long? We have one but it will not go off unless the temp is 60 or more. I thought about running a dehumidifier up there but I fear the coils freezing up because it is about 40 degrees. Has anyone ever heard of a dehumidifier that is for attic areas?

Can I hang plastic from the bottom of the rafters, stapling it into place? There would be about 4-5 inches between the roof timbers and the plastic.

Thank you for your advice...my husband thanks you too as it makes for less stress in my life here in the Money Pit.

Windelin Rickard
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Peter
Posted on Monday, January 17, 2005 - 07:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi,

Should you decide to fit insulation between the rafters keep the insulation at least 2" away from the roof or you could end up with a problem called interstitial condensation.

I understand there are solar powered vents and electric vents available to help force vent your roof space.

By fitting the plastic sheet without correcting the ventilation problem you could possibly end up with more condensation forming on the plastic.

At this stage anything is worth a try, the staples should hold the plastic sheet in place.

Kind Regards,

Peter Crawley, M.I.o.R.

www.crawleyroofing.com
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R MALIK
Posted on Friday, May 27, 2005 - 12:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have a stock of 12"x 12" Black & Multi Real good quality SLATE FLOORING TILES in TORONTO,CANADA

Anyone interested can reach me at malikritesh@gmail.com
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John
Posted on Monday, June 20, 2005 - 04:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hello,

I found your web site and was hoping you could help me. I'm putting a new roof on my house (not slate, ...sorry..., wish I could afford it) and I have a few questions about flashing. I am using a very heavy asphalt shingle that mimics slate and I want to install copper valleys and step flashing to maintain the look and style of a slate roof. I've done many asphalt roofs with aluminum flashing but not much copper. I've heard many conflicting ideas regarding the dos and don'ts when it comes to copper and I just wanted to make sure I'm doing it right.

Basically, I want to do a 10' copper valley with a standing seam (or "crimp") down the center. Can that be made of one 10' piece or should it be several short pieces to allow for expansion? If so, do the laps need to be hooked or crimped, or just a flat overlay with a little caulk? (It's an 8:12 pitch)

Is the standing point in the center an actual seam or just a 'V' bend made on a break? Is there a maximum length for any one piece of copper flashing? I've been told it's only 4' but I've seen 6 and 8 foot ridge caps that were all soldered together across the whole ridge with no expansion joints at all. Does copper really expand and contract much over it's length?

Sorry for the long list of questions but I would greatly appreciate any help you could give me.

Thanks,
John
Rochester, NY
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Rob McArdle
Posted on Monday, August 15, 2005 - 06:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My girfriends mum has recently purchased a new house, one of the internal walls apprears to be clad with large slabs of green slate. The slate is in extremely good condition and is fixed on a sand:cement bed so the overall thickness of the slabs remains hidden. However a couple of pieces do project out of the bedding and reveal the slate to be around 2 inches thick, wether this is consistant is unknown.

My question to the more experienced -

"do you think that our find has any potential value?

Your opinions would be greatly appreciated and will decifer wether or not we skip or sell

Rob McArdle
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Chris M
Posted on Thursday, August 18, 2005 - 09:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is there a problem with powerwashing a slate roof?
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admin
Posted on Thursday, August 18, 2005 - 04:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just talked to a guy who had his slate roof power washed. He said it worked beautifully. They used a "cherry picker" and washed it from above with just water (no solvent).

Joe Jenkins
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Anonymous
Posted on Friday, August 19, 2005 - 08:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It may help the slate look great but you have to worry about what it is doing to the underlayment. IF it washes away and knowing the quality of slate work these days it may cause leaks. Just something to think about
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admin
Posted on Saturday, August 20, 2005 - 07:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The underlayment is essentially without value once the roof has been installed. It is intended to keep the water out of the building during the roof installation. It does not serve any long-term purpose on a properly installed slate roof with adequate slope. In other words, the underlayment is the last thing you need to be worried about.
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Alan
Posted on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 05:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi! I have a roof of flat asbestos shingles (maybe 40 years old) and would like to install some Velux windows in rooms built into the attic. Is there any health risk with having velux windows there, in the ceilings so to speak?
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n
Posted on Saturday, October 08, 2005 - 06:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have a slate gable on a flat roof, my problem I think is in the ridge and gutters of the roof as well as the two cones on each side.

How do I replace the gutters?

What is the best ridge material to use?

Where do I purchase cone caps and how are they installed?

I resurfaced flat portion as well as rise but building still leaks up front. Building is 100+ years old and probably no repairs ever done to slate portion of roof.

Can anyone help?
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victoriab
Posted on Friday, October 14, 2005 - 12:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We live in Philadelphia in a three story Victorian house that was built at the turn of the century. There are actually 2 slate roofs in a sort of 'barn' construction. I'm sure that's not what it's called technically, but describes roughly what it looks like. There are two slate roofs at different pitches, the top roof section measuring about 40'x10'. We are having 2 major leaks around the chimneys where apparently there is a lot of damage to the slate. The roofer is suggesting that we replace that entire roof (40'x10')with shingles for $4500. The other option is replacing with slate. Can anyone advise me from the point of view of resale value of our home? The price for slate replacement is $9k, which I feel we could only consider if replacing it with shingles will diminish the resale value of the house by that much. You can see this section of the roof from across the street. It isn't really visible close up. Any help would be GREATLY appreciated
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Walter Musson
Posted on Friday, October 14, 2005 - 04:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The flatter pitch of the upper roof on your Mansard home can probably be repaired and the chimneys reflashed properly for less than the shingle job .Your resale value would not be diminished if you choose this route.
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admin
Posted on Friday, October 14, 2005 - 08:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is this a mansard or a gambrel?

It's a terrible idea to replace part of a slate roof with asphalt shingles. At the very least, replace it with salvaged slate, *if* it actually needs replaced. It sounds like your roofer is not proficient at slate - otherwise he wouldn't be giving you the bad advice you're getting (asphalt shingles).

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