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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 63
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 02:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The headlap is fine. The underlayment laid on top of the slates is a mistake which now creates a maintenance nuisance until it eventually turns to dust.
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Walter Musson
Junior Member
Username: Walter_musson

Post Number: 11
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 04:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You have a 3" headlap then- you're all set there.
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Jeff
New member
Username: Jeffgnyc

Post Number: 5
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 09:16 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Slates are Vermont Gray. 14 X 20 with 8.5" of exposed face. The pitch is 8:12.
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 60
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, February 11, 2007 - 08:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Can you find out the headlap, or slate size and exposure, and the slope of the roof?
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jeff glennon
New member
Username: Jeffgnyc

Post Number: 4
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Friday, February 09, 2007 - 08:58 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The roof is original to the house 1947. From what I have read they installed felt to slightly decrease the amount of slate needed on the roof. I have read about this technique in several places. I have not measured the headlap but it appears to be enough to have lasted all these years without leaking.
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 58
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 08, 2007 - 11:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

When was the roof installed and why was underlayment installed between the courses? What is the headlap? You may have a much bigger problem there than is immediately apparent. If there is no or little headlap and the felt paper is what's keeping the roof from leaking, the entire roof will have to be removed and re-installed correctly.
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Walter Musson
New member
Username: Walter_musson

Post Number: 10
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, February 07, 2007 - 02:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Retrofit guards like you're going to use are more likely to fail during heavy snow loading.
Heres an album showing installation of the best snow guards made .
http://share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome?sid=8cbsmrhqzlg
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jeff glennon
New member
Username: Jeffgnyc

Post Number: 3
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, February 07, 2007 - 01:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That would mean removing and reinstalling about 70 pieces of slate. I am trying to minimize the impact to the existing roof. Is that my only option?
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claude holmes
New member
Username: Claude

Post Number: 1
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, February 07, 2007 - 01:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

why not remove the slate as needed,install the guard shank,re-install the slate with a hook?
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jeff glennon
New member
Username: Jeffgnyc

Post Number: 2
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, February 07, 2007 - 12:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am attempting to install retrofit snowguards. They are the long shank type that hook onto an existing nail in the course above. The slates themselves are in excellent condition. The problem I am having is that there is paper laid between the courses which makes it very difficult to slide the guard up to hook the nail. The paper was apparently installed originally to "stretch" the slate. In lieu of face nailing does anyone have any advice or suggestions?

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