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Karen Richter
New member
Username: Karen

Post Number: 2
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Saturday, July 07, 2007 - 12:03 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Joe I appreciate your help.
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 143
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, June 29, 2007 - 09:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Karen,

You cannot salvage the split slate. You should be able to find a replacement. You will have difficulty scraping off the tar. You may be able to go right over it with a new piece of metal ridge.
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Karen Richter
New member
Username: Karen

Post Number: 1
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Monday, June 25, 2007 - 12:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)


Hi,
I am sorry to hyjack this thread but I cannot find the link to post a new thread. I am like the previous poster. We just purchased this 1940 Tudor. The problem is on a small entrance front roof(ridge is 49 1/2 inches from front point to back wall). As you can see from the above picture there is a slate that is falling off and one down lower that has split (I have the other half) The roof is not leaking but I would like to repair it. I have a few questions.
Can I salvage the split one? If so what is the right way to do this?
I will use copper hooks to put both slates back in place.
After the slate repair, Can I scrape all that ugly tar off and add a copper ridge over the top?
I would like to glue it in place and if that is possible what kind of glue or epoxy should I use?
This is a very small job and I would like to tackle it myself. The roof is accessable from the front by ladder and the back by a window so I would not have to go on the slate for the fix.
I appreciate any and all help.
Thank you,
Karen
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Thursday, December 14, 2006 - 01:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

52 - that's young! You're an inspiration!
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Jane Weeks
Posted on Wednesday, December 13, 2006 - 08:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes, Joe I am doing it myself. I'm 52 and these are my first roofing jobs. I am mostly using a young Honduran day laborer to help me and any willing friend. He speaks some English and I speak almost no Spanish so it's been a challenge. He is a good worker and we are both learning a new trade. The blind leading the blind with very little conversation. I have had a friend help me a few weekends but he's never done any roofing either. He does speak some Spanish and that has really helped. I could never have done it without your book! It's wonderful! I'm happy with the results so far. It's not perfect but it's not bad either. The garage and sheds are practice for the house roof, if I can ever figure out what to do with that flashing. I think about it all the time so I'm sure I'll make a decision soon. I'm trying to get it done before January. Thanks for all your input, Jane
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Wednesday, December 13, 2006 - 06:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There are illustrations about saddle ridges on this web site at http://www.slateroofcentral.com/install_hips_ridges.htm.

Let me know whether these answer your questions.

You don't need the furring strip - you can go right over the existing slate with the saddle slate. You will have to nail through the underlying slates. We often use a 16 penny nail as a punch, but a 3/16" masonry bit on a drill will drill holes without breaking the underlying slates.

The saddle slates should overlap each other at least halfway. On a 10X18 slate, there would then be 10X9" exposure on the saddle slates.

Jane - are you doing this work yourself?
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Jane Weeks
Posted on Monday, December 11, 2006 - 06:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Joe, I want to do a saddle ridge. The house had comb ridges with exposed nails and leaked around the nails. In your book, page 166 you have a picture of it but I don't know how to over lap the top? On page 282, German examples, you can see that the slate is layed one on top of the other to hide nails then the oposit side is put on and goes over the top an inch or two. Do I do the same thing with my rectangular slates? Also, I've redone everything with 12X18, I was going to use unpunched 10X18 for the ridge. I was going to leave 3 inches between the end of the slate and the nail holes when I punch them. Is this right? Jane

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