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ron kugel
Posted on Wednesday, November 29, 2006 - 06:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I agree , I had also speculated that the person drilling or punching the holes had not installed any or very little slate or was just learning ect..... all lumps and bumps at the bottom,thin side up, really does make a difference for installing.
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Wednesday, November 29, 2006 - 11:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Another issue I have found with new slate is that when it's drilled for nail holes (rather than punched), the knurls, knuckles, thick ends and bumps end up either in the top half of the slate or on the bottom half underneath. The irregularities must be on the exposed face (bottom half, front) in order for the slate to lie properly on the roof. When slates are hand punched for nail holes, the person doing the punching is looking at every slate and flipping them over or around to make sure the holes are in the top (thinner) half and any bumps are on the front. When slates are drilled, they're often just stacked in piles and drilled all at once with little concern for these important nuances. The only solution that I'm aware of for this problem is to cull out the slates that aren't right. This leads to more waste, but there's not much else you can do about it.
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Charles Ackerman
Posted on Wednesday, November 29, 2006 - 10:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It is an existing building that was built in 1933.
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Stephen J Taran
Posted on Tuesday, November 28, 2006 - 11:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thats what happens when you try to save money on roofing slate you get what you pay for, I would save them out and send them back the should replace them. I use Taran Brothers slate and Camara slate and first of all they charge a little more then Evergreen but would never send bowed or bent or knotts in the slate. But when a company ships out several hundreds squares a week this is what you get lack of quality control. Charles next time send me an email if you need slate I will price it out and get you the best slate at the best price
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Walter Musson
Posted on Tuesday, November 28, 2006 - 05:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Some of those slates tend to have knots and bulges on them-sometimes requiring an angle grinder to smooth them so that the next slate above will lay better.
I would think the tolerance factor would depend on the clients expectations and satisfaction level. Is it new construction or an older building?
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Charles Ackerman
Posted on Tuesday, November 28, 2006 - 09:10 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Correction - the slate is 1/4" to 3/8" random thickness also.
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Charles Ackerman
Posted on Tuesday, November 28, 2006 - 08:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The slate being installed is Evergreen - Semi weather Gray Green. The slate is being installed by experienced roofers and not being nailed tight at the top. The slate is 1/4' thick and raandom widths 10" to 14".
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Thursday, November 23, 2006 - 12:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A common mistake made when installing slate by an inexperienced installer is holding the top of the slate down tight to the roof when nailing. The top of the slate doesn't need to be tight against the roof. It's more important that the bottom is lying flat, so when the slate rocks, hold the bottom of the slate down and let the top float (or shim it, if needed).
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ron kugel
Posted on Wednesday, November 22, 2006 - 08:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yeah with random thickness it is about impossible to avoid having some gaps at the bottom edge of the slate, all we can do is try to minimize the size of the gaps with what we have to work with meaning both time & material... Also do not drive your nails to tight this will either lift one side of the slate or cause the bottom of your slate to lift on those slate that are not laying quite right... Thomas,awesome slate job,really enjoyed the pics.
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Thomas Massie
Posted on Wednesday, November 22, 2006 - 07:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have wondered the same thing myself. I bought 1/4 to 3/8" slate. At the extremes, some are probably 3/16 and some are probably 1/2". We're trying not to lay a 3/16 slate next to a 1/2" slate, and most of them lay really flat, but occasionaly we have a few (1%?) that are almost 1/4" higher at the butts than they should be. I have tried all of the tricks that Ron mentioned, and they all work in the right places, but it's hard to eliminate entirely. (although I suppose it could be done if you had infinite time).

Yes, my roof deck is not perfect, and occasionally, I do find a cupped slate. (I try to save those and use 'em where I need the cupped effect to fix a problem, but I never can find those cupped slates when I want them... probably because I've accidentally incorporated them into the roof by that point!)

Yes, I've shimed where shimming will help (especially at the hips and ridges) to keep this from happening.

Yes, I've read in the SRB that the conscientious slaters sort the slate thicknesses before laying. We have not done this... partly because it's a lot of work and a logistical nightmare... And primarily because I've used random width, two colors, and two lengths slates... all to be distributed randomly. Sorting the slates by thickness would skew the randomness. For instance, most of the grey's are thicker than the green slates, but I don't want all of the grey slates to be at the bottom of the roof.
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ron kugel
Posted on Wednesday, November 22, 2006 - 04:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What type,size & thickness slate are you installing? Is the roof deck rough or uneven? Are your slate cupped or slightly curled? some installations you do have a few slates that do not lay quite flat,but we always try to get them to lay as flat as possible,at times you may have to trim the top corners at an angle,or wedge the top of the slate with a nail or shim ect. or even do a little chisel work to remove some lumps or if the lumps are on the outer edge and above your exposure use your slate hammer just as you would to put a nail hole in the slate and this will eliminate some of the lumps or imperfections that may lift the slate above it, also sometimes you just have to find the right slate for a certain spot. Snow & ice will find the slate that are not laying flat enough.
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Charles Ackerman
Posted on Wednesday, November 22, 2006 - 10:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In a new slate reroof installation of +150 square, what would be an acceptable percentage of slate that is not resting completely level on the underlieing slate. Is there a tolerance factor allowed? All efforts are being extended to minimize the problem but it seems impossible to delete in it's entirety. Is there an allowable tolerance?

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