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Brycenesbitt (Brycenesbitt)
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Username: Brycenesbitt

Post Number: 27
Registered: 08-2012
Posted on Tuesday, December 03, 2013 - 01:16 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The pictured tile was definitely leaking. I had spares. It was easy to change.

The crack in the first photo, by the way, was caused by the metal stucco edging installed in 1938. It was turned up too high, resulting in a thin spot right where it cracked.

Note: I'd be happy with a slightly leaky tile roof over vented attic. But with cellulose below now, minor leaks are a much bigger deal.
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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1038
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Monday, December 02, 2013 - 06:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If it isn't leaking, leave it alone.
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Brycenesbitt (Brycenesbitt)
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Username: Brycenesbitt

Post Number: 25
Registered: 08-2012
Posted on Sunday, December 01, 2013 - 01:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thank for the referral!

I've now replaced all the bad tiles and cracks.

One oddity was a tile that seems to have disintegrated, and then was badly patched. Over time it destroyed the tar paper below as well:

Ludowici tile deteriorated


I'm not yet sure how far to try and repair the tar paper.The roof here is decked with 1x8 boards, above an insulated cathedral ceiling. Somehow my sense is that a breathable membrane is better than the old tar here, and maybe leaving it open is better than trying to seal it.
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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1036
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Tuesday, November 26, 2013 - 08:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The company that sells the Flexim is called Lifetime building supply in Brighton Michigan. their phone number is 248-624-0600. tell them that John Crookston or "Old School" told you to call. I stopped by there today and picked up some and told them about you. they helped us a bit at the last slate roofing conference
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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1030
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Friday, November 01, 2013 - 07:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That of course is why we normally use copper.
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Brycenesbitt (Brycenesbitt)
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Username: Brycenesbitt

Post Number: 24
Registered: 08-2012
Posted on Friday, November 01, 2013 - 12:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How about bolting a few zinc anodes on the edge (such anodes are a common boating or commercial saltwater pipe or dock supply)?

The Rustoleum 7400/4200 specify "lightly rusted surfaces" and I'm not sure the pictured flashing counts as lightly rusted.

I can't get paint under the stucco, and if I did break out the stucco I'd replace the flashing.

I presume that the flashing will rust first under the stucco, out of view.

(Message edited by brycenesbitt on November 01, 2013)
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Milo (Milo)
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Username: Milo

Post Number: 22
Registered: 05-2009
Posted on Friday, November 01, 2013 - 11:50 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've used the Rustoleum "zinc in a spray can" for weatherheads that I wanted to freshen up. It seems to work OK but if you use it on flashings I would definitely put a final coat of tinners paint as others here have suggested. (Or just skip the zinc and use the paint).

MILO
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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1029
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Wednesday, October 30, 2013 - 07:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We get the Flexim from an outfit in the Detroit area. I will look up the number and get back on here with it for you. I believe they are the ones that bring it into the country. It is made in Belgium I believe. If you can "Zinc" up the flashing, more power to you. I would tend to clean it and use the paint.

Sounds like you have the right idea. Have fun with it.
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Brycenesbitt (Brycenesbitt)
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Username: Brycenesbitt

Post Number: 22
Registered: 08-2012
Posted on Tuesday, October 29, 2013 - 10:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the encouragement.

Is there a way to re-galvanize that flashing?
Add a chunk of zinc like on ships?
Or is rustoleum the right thing?

---
I've disassembled the roof cap (it mostly fell apart). Inside was newspaper used to hold back mortar, which the roof rats apparently really liked.

The tile was easy to wire back.

I'm trying to track down some Flexim.

I'm debating trying to rig up a wooden ridge cap (like in the Ray Koreck video from slate roof central), but that might be beyond me, and the first set of tiles is set too closely to really install one without a lot of adjusting.
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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1028
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Tuesday, October 29, 2013 - 08:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The tiles are relatively easy to fix. If you have the replacement tiles, break out the old ones and just wire the new ones into place. Use some copper wire and your imagination on how to attach it. A copper nail driven into the roof above where you want it to rest helps to give you something to wrap around so you can pull it into place.

If you have cleaned it, you did a lot more than the previous owners. As long as it doesn't leak, keep at it and send us pictures. good luck!
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Brycenesbitt (Brycenesbitt)
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Username: Brycenesbitt

Post Number: 21
Registered: 08-2012
Posted on Tuesday, October 29, 2013 - 04:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Does it leak? No. (Though Realtor-quality repairs elsewhere mean anything is possible).

My goal is to repair three cracked tiles and the ridge cap, learning enough about the trade along the way, with the hope that whoever eventually re-roofs does not shudder and shake their head at my repair. The wood edge question is an attempt to be complete.

---
The first 75 years this roof had no cellulose insulation below, so minor leaks had a better chance to dry out.

--
One tile cracked at a change in slope.

---
I've cleaned the flashings, one of which had pounds of foam roofing granules, tar gobs, moss and dead chickens (1). Here's a picture, after removal of two rows and most of the debris:



There is no lapping into the brick.
The convex row of tiles lapped only as far as the rust line visible on the flashing.

(1) Roof rats actually.



(Message edited by brycenesbitt on October 29, 2013)
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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1026
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Saturday, October 19, 2013 - 09:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here is the question you want to ask. Does it leak? If it has been like that since 1938, that makes it about 75 years old. If it has not leaked in 75 years, why mess with it now? On the other hand, if you are having problems with birds and such, you could consider trying to fill in the bottoms. flexim would be the best way to do that. Someone has "patched' the tiles where they tie into the wall, so it has been worked on.

You will find that if you take the tiles off, there will be little if any under-layment left as it will "cook" over the years. I guess my question is "What do you want to do?" If it is not broken though, don't try and fix it.
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Brycenesbitt (Brycenesbitt)
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Username: Brycenesbitt

Post Number: 20
Registered: 08-2012
Posted on Saturday, October 19, 2013 - 04:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Would Ludowici straight barrel mission tiles have a maker mark? These don't.

But regardless the core question was that unpainted wood edge at the edge line. Is that a problem? Was that done badly in 1938? Does this style of tile really need underlayment if not what protects the wood from usual wood problems?
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Brycenesbitt (Brycenesbitt)
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Username: Brycenesbitt

Post Number: 18
Registered: 08-2012
Posted on Saturday, October 19, 2013 - 04:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The tile has no maker marks, does Ludowici stamp their tiles?

But regardless: the wood is the core part of this question. Should I try to slip something under the old paper at the edge? Should I tear the whole roof off? Did the paper "shrink", or was this done wrong from the start?
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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1024
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Thursday, October 17, 2013 - 06:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That looks like Ludowici Spanish tile. At any rate, you can get the bird stops from them or any of the companies on here that sell used tile and accessories. They are hard to install after the fact though. Perhaps some of the Flexim would be an easier alternative. It is like mortar, but a lot lighter and it is VERY sticky.
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Brycenesbitt (Brycenesbitt)
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Username: Brycenesbitt

Post Number: 15
Registered: 08-2012
Posted on Thursday, October 17, 2013 - 02:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The tar paper below my 1938 Spanish clay tile roof appears intact. Along one edge the paper is shy a good inch and another 3-4 inches from the wood edge. The wood is painted on three sides and appears in good shape. I don't know the wood species, but the sills on the house are really nice redwood.

What would you advise, if anything, to do here?
Is a metal flashing appropriate?
And what style bird net would you suggest here (birds do nest underneath. we enjoy the birds... but...)

Climate: San Francisco Bay Area fog belt.

Paper shy of wood edge
View from above

(Message edited by brycenesbitt on October 17, 2013)

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