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anne marie bland
Posted on Saturday, August 09, 2003 - 06:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

hello..im about to move house and the roof needs looking at...i had three quotes and each one was diffrent...but one was saying it needs new felting...and the other guy said you do not need it as it rots away anyway and is only used when the roof is being tiled.
it is a tiled roof at my new address and not slate so could some one pleas tell me the truth about what is needed on the ...or in the ...roof
thankyou...from a woman who dosnt know who to belive
anne maybe some one could send me an e-mail telling me...annebland@ntlworld.com thanks
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Tuesday, August 12, 2003 - 09:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Where is the roof located and what kind of tile is on it? What is the slope of the roof? How old is it?
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anne balnd
Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - 12:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

the roof is old i think they said its the one that was built with the house in 1928 they say its hard to replace the tiles. as they dont make them anymore ..but i dont know what sort they are. the slopes on the roof...well one is a not so steep slope as it goes to a window over bedroom the rest is normal roof coverage..and i think its all over ...well it is but i dont know what you mean ....eeeeeee
i hope that answers you question...im a bit behind on roofing...reson being i dont know anything about them ...heheheh...sorry i still hope you may be able to answer my first question though
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Thursday, August 14, 2003 - 08:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tiles roofs generally are more dependent on underlayment than slate (which usually does not need any underlayment - unless it is a very coarse and/or irregular slating application). Most tile roofs are not as tight as slate and a heavy underlayment is used. That said, however, there are many very old tile roofs in Europe with little or no underlayment. Slope is important - the steeper the better.
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Thursday, August 14, 2003 - 08:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

PS: If the roof is not leaking and the felt has deteriorated, then obviously the felt is not necessary.
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anne
Posted on Thursday, August 14, 2003 - 05:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

thankyou very nuch for all your help...
if i need you again i will shout for you...form grimsby..hehehe thanks bye anne
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John Sprung
Posted on Thursday, October 23, 2003 - 06:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I tore off a tile roof on my 1926 house this summer. The felt had worn through wherever the tiles contacted it, probably from expansion and contraction, wind and rain impact, earthquakes, and perhaps from very infrequent foot traffic. Vines had got up into one corner, and it was visibly leaking there. But most of the rest of it appears also to have leaked just a little. On the underside, most of the boards looked pretty good, just a few small areas of water damage visible. But on top where the holes in the felt were, drywood termites had eaten almost all the way through. They didn't venture very far across the grain from these small leaks, but they did seem to find wet enough wood to eat following the grain and the edges of the tiles. Many of the rafters were completely destroyed by termites, as were the top plates. Fixing all that was the reason the tear-off was necessary. This, btw, is a 7 in 12 roof in Los Angeles, CA.

So, bottom line, the felt seems not to do any good at all except maybe for the first few years.

I carefully saved all the tiles, as they're a kind that is no longer available. My neighbor across the street has dibs on some for repairs he needs to do, but thereafter I'll be selling the rest. They're multi-colored concrete tiles in the style of Spanish clay tiles.

For the new roof, I'm doing standing seam copper. I'm surprised that we don't see more of it out here in earthquake country. It's an excellent roof, and very light weight, which is a major plus when the structure is subjected to severe horizontal motion. Tile has a nasty tendency to break and slide off in a quake, just as people are getting scared and running out the door.

The new sheathing is 23/32" plywood, unavoidable because code here forbids solid sawn boards for new work. I'll be putting torch down or something on it soon to protect it through the rainy season, and doing the copper work next summer.


-- J.S.
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Shawn Smith
Posted on Wednesday, November 30, 2005 - 10:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

One of the main reasons for an underlayment is to compensate for condensation. The air in your attic is of course going to be warmer than the air outside and your tiles are going to be somewhere in-between. Which means that just like a cold glass in a warm room will collect condensation on it, your tiles, being a cooler temperature than the air in your attic, are also going to collect condensation on them. There may not be any immediate danger as long as the tiles stay intact but there can definitely be a moisture problem with the condensation and that of course can lead to mildew and mold problems. Also as the tiles age many types will absorb water and allow moisture to seep through to a limited extent, here again making an underlayment a definite favorite. It has been my experience that an underlayment will last for a very long time, I have not seen any cases where the underlayment has worn out unless there were tiles damaged which exposed it to the weather.
So I would sum up my opinion as being that an underlayment is definitely favorable but a lack of one is not an immediate catastrophe, there are after all many older roofs which have none at all.

http://www.practicalpressure.com

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