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John R. Crookston
Junior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 14
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Thursday, January 08, 2009 - 01:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just be honest and know your costs. To do it for less than it costs without any recourse will just run you out of business and you will not be able to be there to do the repairs the next time....for anyone!!

You might just as well work for someone!
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Joseph Dotson
New member
Username: Stonewall357

Post Number: 1
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Thursday, January 08, 2009 - 07:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I do a lot of asphalt shingle repairs here around knoxville tn. When a customer calls I go give a free estimate. But I have a minimum of $350. If it takes an hour or all day I am going to charge at least $350. I have invested thousands of dollars to go in business, took substantial risks, and put it all on the line for one thing: To make money. A homeowner should realize they are taking risks dealing with a lowballer. They may think my price is a little high, but they know that I'm serious, and I'm gonna see to it the job is done like my life depends on it. As far as competition I don't worry what others are charging. If I need to replace one shingle, then I'm gonna find something else to do to give the home owner as much as I can for the money. I may clean out the gutters, trim tree limbs back away from the house, or look for something else that needs attention. But I didn't go in business to make 10-20 dollars an hour.
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carlos torres
Junior Member
Username: Slatesergen

Post Number: 20
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, March 24, 2008 - 07:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

i see how far out you live
you do not use clippers to cut womens hair
have you ever hear of highlights
gess not
thats cool
to each his own
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Slate Affair Inc.
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 197
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Friday, March 21, 2008 - 04:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Carlos if you pay a $100.00 for her hair cut thats your problem. You need to get some clippers. That will save you.
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Branden Wilson
New member
Username: Branden_wilson

Post Number: 7
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Sunday, March 09, 2008 - 04:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

i don't think you're wrong carlos, it's a tough balance. it just depends on the individual situation.
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carlos torres
New member
Username: Slatesergen

Post Number: 6
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Sunday, March 09, 2008 - 01:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

my wife hair doo cost me a 100 buck this morning
go figure
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carlos torres
New member
Username: Slatesergen

Post Number: 5
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Saturday, March 08, 2008 - 11:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

true
but the reality is that everybody is looking for a deal
and if every slater is priced about the same it will be good and craftsmens work will be valued
i think it is an insult for someone to pay a $100 dollors for anything to do with slate

Am i wrong
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Branden Wilson
New member
Username: Branden_wilson

Post Number: 3
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Saturday, March 08, 2008 - 09:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

oh carlos, yes the older gents will indeed eventually go but it's up to guys like us to keep the spirit alive. i've asked around and when someone sees something wrong with a slate roof, they rarely blame the roofers but the slate. of course i usually try to get paid for my work but sometimes we have to just suck it up and donate our skills to help maintain slate's wonderful reputation.
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Ward Hamilton
New member
Username: Olde_mohawk_masonry__historic_restoration

Post Number: 8
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Saturday, March 08, 2008 - 04:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

As Joe said, try to build value into the cost of your service. I've seen few roofs that only needed one slate touched. Give them an inspection and recommend future services. An in-depth, quality inspection is worth $80-$120, alone.

Yes, Kurtis, $75 is reasonable in-town. Or, as Joe said, gratis for existing customers. Treating them right is just good business practice. When you have built customer trust, they have faith in your services, skills and abilities. They won't feel a need to question your price, or shop you, when its time to reflash a chimney, replace a valley or do a similarly 'involved' project.

I think that the "100 Man" is a rare find and one that will soon become extinct. His assertions specific to the steel nails and roof about to fail give rise to a theory: Was the first, cheap hit part of a larger ploy to establish trust and, ultimately make the big bananas?

Miriam said: "Knowing if we were treated fairly the first time around would give me a better sense of how much to trust his opinion and his forthcoming estimate on my options."

Hmmmmmm.
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carlos torres
New member
Username: Slatesergen

Post Number: 1
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, March 07, 2008 - 11:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

90% of the people on this message board are on there way to retirment
once the old school guys are gone i think the pricing will go up because younger people will not do something for nothing like miriam contracter did, if he was lagit
she got luckey
the contractor made $8 dollors for his time
at least he can buy a 12 pack for the ride home
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Kurtis Hord
Intermediate Member
Username: Kwhord

Post Number: 31
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Friday, March 07, 2008 - 11:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm small potatoes. Myself and one helper, runs $38 per hour. That includes all operating cost of the business, plus insurance. So my minimum charge is around $75 before materials. That covers a quarter-day of work.
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 235
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, March 07, 2008 - 11:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You should have a "minimum charge," especially if you have employees, a truck fleet, workers comp, liability and a facility with utility costs, etc. We try to keep ours around $250.00, but if there is only one slate off and it's for an existing customer, then we will charge much less (or nothing sometimes), especially if we can just swing by and repair it while in the neighborhood. I would rather have someone else repair the roof than send my guys out to do it for cheap. I have to figure my labor rates at $75/man hour (2007), which includes all the overhead costs, and I include drive time in the hour calculation because I pay the guys for the time from when they leave the shop to the time they get back. Insurance rates are based on hours worked (i.e. payroll). That means I'm paying workers comp and liability when the guys are driving to and from a job, not just when they're on a roof. So the customer has to cover that.

If we have two guys on a job for an hour and add a half hour travel time, you have 3 man hours tied up, or $225.00 plus materials (rounded to $250.00). That's pretty much a minimum charge. We won't *just* replace a slate for $250.00, but we will look the roof over and see what else it needs. If it's minimal (a few slates) we'll repair them at no extra charge. If it's more major (flashing replacement), we'll write up a proposal. We try to give the customer their money's worth. When I worked alone with no employees and no insurance, I could charge much less. Those were the good old days - now long gone.
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Kurtis Hord
Member
Username: Kwhord

Post Number: 29
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Friday, March 07, 2008 - 09:48 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

$100 IN TOWN would have been reasonable though, Ward? I charge $75 for a single tile in town. If I were traveling an hour each way, I couldn't do it for less than $150.
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Ward Hamilton
New member
Username: Olde_mohawk_masonry__historic_restoration

Post Number: 7
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Thursday, March 06, 2008 - 06:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

$100 was not a reasonable price.

You should have paid significantly more.

The slater travelled "about an hour" each way? Let's assume that's 80 miles total at the gov't per diem rate of $0.485/mile. That's $38.80 for gas, mileage, wear & tear on a vehicle, alone. Two hours travel time at a meager $25/hour is another $50. Work on a slate roof in snowy conditions? How do we put a price on that? Let's see, we're up to $88.80 without the work, 1/2 of our day is shot to do this single repair, and while up there we're going to reset some other slate as well. Hmm....

I think up to $200 would have been fair.
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 197
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Saturday, December 22, 2007 - 02:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The $100 repair was more than reasonable, however the claim that the roof is about to fail because of steel nails is bogus. 100 years on good steel nails under a hard slate is not exceptional - they can last much longer. The only way the claim holds merit is if the original nails were of very poor quality, which is unlikely. I have seen much older steel nails in reasonably good condition.

It sounds like the roof needs typical repairs. It´s normal for a roof of that age to be losing some slates. The galvanized steel slate hooks are poor quality and should be replaced with copper or stainless, or with a nail and bib.

If the slate is still good, you can expect the roof to last much longer. Five years is not realistic. It would be helpful if you posted a photo of the roof. Just because th man said the roof is VT green doesn´t mean it is.

I only ever once ran into a roof that I recommended be reslated due to bad nails - that´s since 1968 amd well over a thousand roofs. It was nailed with box nails, not roofing nails, which is ridiculous. That was 20 years ago. The roof never was replaced and it´s still there, same slates and all.
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Miriam J.
New member
Username: Mirdreams

Post Number: 1
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Friday, December 21, 2007 - 01:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yesterday we lost a single slate off off our roof and since it was on the very edge, with no slate beneath it, we wanted it be up as promptly as possible. On a friend's recommendation I did find someone to come out the same day (he lives about an hour away) and was pleased to see he re-affixed the lost slate with the nail and bib method, using a copper bib. Having done some internet research I knew that was a preferred method and could more over see that the slate that had fallen had been repaired before using a straphanger, which had given way under the heavy snow we've had recently falling off the roof. While he was up there he also secured two adjoining slates that were slipping (apparently the original nails were steel). For this he charged me $100. Given how far he'd come, how helpful he was in explaining everything, his willingness to tromp around in the snow and the fact he got the slate back on the roof the same day it fell off, I thought this was reasonable.

The reason I'm asking the forum if this truly a reasonable price is because of the other thing he told me after looking the roof over. He said that our slate was a Vermont green that was in good shape (the house is about 100 years old). So that was the good news. The bad news was that the roof had been originally affixed using steel nails, which were all failing, and that the hooks that are visible in some places from the ground were earlier repairs that were also done with steel that was rusting away. He suggested the roof had about five years before slates began falling down in earnest. He said there were three real options: 1) wait for slates to fall down, hope they landed on something fairly soft so they didn't break, and put them back up, 2) take all the slates off, sell them and use that to finance putting on a new asphalt roof or 3) take all the slates off and put them back on with new fasteners and flashing. Obviously 3) is the preferable option but we're afraid it might be financially infeasible. Moreover we'd like to know how realistic the timetable for failure is. I can see that there are at least two other slates on the roof that are sliding, and since it's a dutch colonial there may more on the upper part of the roof that aren't visible from below. Knowing if we were treated fairly the first time around would give me a better sense of how much to trust his opinion and his forthcoming estimate on my options. I will most likely get estimates from two other reputable slaters as well (I think that's just common sense, especially since it isn't urgent). I would appreciate any help or suggestions with this.

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