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Joe (Joe)
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Username: Joe

Post Number: 821
Registered: 07-2006


Posted on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 01:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hail Damage to Slate Roofs

PDF

Read it in the RCI Interface Magazine
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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1057
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Wednesday, April 23, 2014 - 08:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Something changed to make it leak all along the ridge. I would still suspect condensation, but then again, I haven't been there.
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Mattsv1983 (Mattsv1983)
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Username: Mattsv1983

Post Number: 5
Registered: 02-2014
Posted on Monday, April 21, 2014 - 03:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The water stains arem what I would call dirty.
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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1051
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Sunday, March 02, 2014 - 12:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Again my question, is the water clear or dirty?
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Mattsv1983 (Mattsv1983)
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Username: Mattsv1983

Post Number: 4
Registered: 02-2014
Posted on Sunday, March 02, 2014 - 12:10 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the replies everyone.

There are three structures and three different pitches. I asked already if there was a dehumidifier and there isn't one.

It makes sense for it to leak on the ridgeline considering that at a pitch of 23 it's about the only place that water wont wick from.

I really did use deductive reasoning on this, and even called HAAG for their opinion.

I'll contact your company monday BTW.
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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1050
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2014 - 09:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just out of curiosity, is the water dirty of clear? I am wondering if the church installed a humidifier and it may be condensing at the ridge. Nothing that you have been saying really makes sense. Why the "whole" ridge all of the sudden? Just asking.
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John_chan (John_chan)
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Username: John_chan

Post Number: 142
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2014 - 08:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Matt,

We've worked on a number of asbestos roofs in New Orleans. It's about 8 hours from Dallas. You can check with our office manager there, Justin Willis, and you can email him at jwillis@durableslate.com or call our main line at 877-340-9181.

John Chan
www.durableslate.com
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Mattsv1983 (Mattsv1983)
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Username: Mattsv1983

Post Number: 3
Registered: 02-2014
Posted on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 - 08:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I know there are leaks because they are all over the cathedral ceiling, covering the entire length of the ridge, and are only in that area.

I'm definately subbing the work out. There's no way I wouldn't use a specialist on a project like this.
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Timtrain35 (Timtrain35)
Junior Member
Username: Timtrain35

Post Number: 19
Registered: 03-2011
Posted on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 - 01:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

First things first, how did you determine the leaks are associated with the ridgeline? Has anyone seen water dripping during a rain or is there staining evident from the inside?

Assuming it is the ridge, typical access would include getting to the gutter/drip edge via a ladder or scaffolding. Once there, either remove a few tiles and set up jacks and planks or some type of "chicken ladder" to get you to the ridge. Once there, Old School is correct about the ridge cap, that's the best and realistically, the only option short of a new roof. You're going to have to attach the clips into the wood as well as your likely safety tie-off points. 67 feet at the ridge line really isn't that high for an experienced steep slope roofer.

The shingles themselves don't blister or get soft, but are prone to becoming brittle and can crack from age. If all this sounds somewhat foreign, i would suggest either politely declining the opportunity or sub-contacting it out. Where i work now, i deal almost exclusively in service type work for all types of roofing systems. When trying to secure this type of work, communication with the client is every bit as important as doing the work. Just tell the truth and identify as many issues you can before they are issues during the job. Generally, this approach is much more accepted. Good luck.
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Mattsv1983 (Mattsv1983)
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Username: Mattsv1983

Post Number: 2
Registered: 02-2014
Posted on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 - 04:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've read the building codes and capping over tile isn't recommended. I wouldn't do it on this since it is a cathedral ceiling, thus anchoring into the T and G could cause splitting. Clipping along the tiles wouldn't be stable enough. You're talking about 900 ft of ridgeline 67 ft in the air, in a high wind area. http://enfield-ct.gov/filestorage/91/12798/4309/Reroofing.pdf

I've been wondering how a crew would get up there. So far I've thought: crane, platforms etc.

So I have to look for holes, but I can't climb on the ridge.

Other questions: Does asbestos just deteriorate like asphalt? Would it separate, would solar make it blister?

I know for a fact there aren't breaks from foot traffic as nobody could get on top of it without a crane, and I know the trees aren't the culprit since they sit 40ft below the ridgeline.
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1049
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Monday, February 24, 2014 - 07:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

First off, how do you intend to get up there to work on it? If it is only leaking at the ridge, I would install a copper cap right over it. You can have it custom bent to fit, and can either drill it and screw it down or try and put down some heavy clips and anchor it to them. Joe has a video of his guys doing one on a regular slate roof. Hail leaves holes!
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Mattsv1983 (Mattsv1983)
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Username: Mattsv1983

Post Number: 1
Registered: 02-2014
Posted on Monday, February 24, 2014 - 04:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi, I'm a contractor and am exploring the possibility of an insurance claim on church's asbestos roof. The sanctuary ridge is leaking and stands 67ft above the ground with a pitch of 20. Roof built in 1962. It has gone through hurricanes, toranados, hail storms etc.

I don't think foot traffic would cause this being at the ridge line, and I have seen hail damage on other parts of the building.

My questions are: What does hail/wind damage look like? What is considered "normal wear and tare?" Is it appropriate to cap over the ridge line over the asbestos? Building codes I've looked at have been questionable. I couldn't anchor into the shingles, or the roof since it's T and G, and the cathedral ceiling's glulam beams are spaced 20 ft apart, so wind would knock off any cap.

I need as many resources as possible.

Thanks

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