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Simon (Simon)
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Username: Simon

Post Number: 6
Registered: 09-2009
Posted on Thursday, September 24, 2009 - 12:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Another, more long-term, solution might be to replace the area of the roof where the moss is worst--this is about 1/4 to 1/3 of the total area. Then, as funds allow, replace the other areas of the roof (with slate, of course). Cutting the tree back will help keep the moss from returning. This will be much more expensive than any of the moss removal/coating choices, but will enhance the roof's durability and will appeal to future buyers (i.e. with the dreaded asbestos removed). I'm assuming if the roof structure supports the weight of asbestos cement tiles that it will also be able to carry slate without additional reinforcing. Is that correct?
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Asbestos1 (Asbestos1)
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Registered: 09-2009
Posted on Saturday, September 19, 2009 - 08:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Simon, you had talked to me (jim)at Mr. Clean Pressure washing in Columbus Ohio. You didn't send me a picture of broken peices, like in your picture on this page. If those tiles are from your roof, you have to get that moss off your roof. Just by looking at the back side of the tile, I see that they are disintegrating along the first two inches of the tile. Your best bet is to clean the roof with steam and apply a new color coating. The moss is keeping the edge to wet for to long the wetter the egde stays, the further it will dissolve. Go to our asbestos page at asbestos1.com and you will see homes with the same kind of asbestos, before, during and after our process.
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Joe (Joe)
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Username: Joe

Post Number: 449
Registered: 07-2006


Posted on Monday, September 14, 2009 - 01:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Henrydog - what size are they? Are they rectangular?
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Henrydog1 (Henrydog1)
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Username: Henrydog1

Post Number: 1
Registered: 09-2009
Posted on Sunday, September 13, 2009 - 06:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have been looking for a any amount of asbestos tiles to repair my house. I sent a photo of the style to Vince the Tile Guy years back. He gave it a style. ACRM54. You can see the tile on his webb site. No response back from him.. I can send pictures to anyone who might have some for sale..I don't have photo at this time..Very pronounced grain. Looks like cedar shakes,only gray. Thanks
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Simon (Simon)
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Username: Simon

Post Number: 5
Registered: 09-2009
Posted on Sunday, September 13, 2009 - 09:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks so much for the tip on D/2 Biological Solution--might be easier to apply than steam, more environmentally friendly than chlorine, and less labor intensive than scrapping. It's good to have options to tackle this problem (removing moss), although in doing so I'm a little nervous about causing unintended short-term/ long-term damage to such an old and fragile asbestos roof. But thanks to the feedback from this board, I think that the balance of risks favors proceeding with the project.
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Olde_mohawk_masonry__historic_restoration (Olde_mohawk_masonry__historic_restoration)
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Username: Olde_mohawk_masonry__historic_restoration

Post Number: 92
Registered: 04-2007


Posted on Thursday, September 10, 2009 - 02:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We have had great results with the below product in masonry applications as well as on slate roofs:

http://www.cathedralstone.com/products/solution.aspx

"D/2 Biological Solution removes organic growth from most surfaces. It lasts a minimum of 5 times longer than bleach, peroxides and powerwashing. D/2 is safe to use near grass and most landscape plantings. D/2 Biological Solution is a safe, easy to use liquid that removes a broad spectrum of biological deposits from hard environmental surfaces. A contact time of only 1 to 2 minutes will loosen most fungal and algal deposits with manual scrubbing and is typically sufficient for excellent results. Growth of bacteria, fungi, algae, lichens and mosses contributes significantly to the degradation of many types of construction materials, and can be disfiguring. D/2 can be utilized to control this problem on outdoor sculptures, monuments, decorative fountains, gravestones, and tombs. Biological growth found on some individual building features (such as parapets and zones of ground contact) or materials (such as stucco) can also be treated with D/2, although it is not a general purpose architectural cleaner."

Product Highlights:

Necessary contact time is usually only 1 to 2 minutes.

Keeps surfaces clean for a minimum of 1 year in most cases.

Safe for landscape plantings and grass

No detrimental effects on masonry

Non-toxic and biodegradable: No special precautions required for handling and storage.
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Joe (Joe)
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Username: Joe

Post Number: 440
Registered: 07-2006


Posted on Tuesday, September 08, 2009 - 05:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Paulin is is Akron.

Paulin Slate and Copper, 627 West Market, No. 8, Akron, Ohio 44303; Ph: 330-242-1574

http://www.slateroofers.org/directory.html#oh
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Simon (Simon)
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Post Number: 4
Registered: 09-2009
Posted on Monday, September 07, 2009 - 05:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Joe, that's interesting about the "wonder bar". Thanks. Compared to chlorine bleach and steam cleaning, it seems more environmentally friendly. So removing the moss would benefit the roof, in your opinion? Do you know anyone in central Ohio experienced in this type of work? I looked in this web site's contractor directory, but couldn't see any members around here who offer to work on asbestos tile roofs. The local "roof cleaners" all use chemicals. If I can't find anyone, I might have to do the job myself--using a safety harness and ladder hooks (like the ACRO # 11082 listed in your online store).
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Joe (Joe)
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Username: Joe

Post Number: 439
Registered: 07-2006


Posted on Monday, September 07, 2009 - 03:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We have scraped moss like this off asbestos roofs using a simple "wonder bar" (flat wrecking bar) and working off a hook ladder. It comes off really easy. No, the air does not fill with asbestos fibers.
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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 236
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Monday, September 07, 2009 - 12:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tough call on your part. I am sure that there are more houses around. There are a lot for sale right now!
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Simon (Simon)
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Username: Simon

Post Number: 3
Registered: 09-2009
Posted on Monday, September 07, 2009 - 11:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for all the information--I hadn't realized about the gutters. The reason that the roof is "uninsurable" is that the insurance underwriters here believe moss will cause roof problems. I have pointed out to several agents that the roof does not leak and is currently insured, but they don't care. They are still paying out on big claims from a freak wind storm last year--so insurers will only accept zero risk business in our area. One agent wanted both the moss and tree removed, while another refused to provide replacement value coverage on the roof for wind and hail. I agree, even putting aside the $5000 removal cost, that cutting down the tree would be ideal to reduce the moss. The pictures don't give an accurate idea of the tree's size--it's truly massive and is actually over 300 years old. So if I want to buy this house, I'm faced with a couple of choices: keep shopping around for an insurance agent that will accept the moss or replace the roof/cut down the tree (although removing the tree will make me very unpopular in the neighborhood).
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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 235
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Sunday, September 06, 2009 - 09:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't understand why the house is "uninsurable" if there is moss on the roofing. It is not leaking is it? I see that they installed regular K style gutters on it. It also has a crown moulding on the bottom, so I suppose they installed them with hangers that are screwed through the old slates. Not a good idea.

As far as the cleaning of the roof, I believe you will do more damage than you will do good. Yes, there are going to be asbestos fibres that come off from the roof when it is cleaned. You have a small piece there, spray it with some clorine bleach and see how long the moss stays alive on it. The problem is still the tree. If you have any old pictures of the house, you will see that it is a "recent" addition. When the house was built, I am sure it was a seedling. The best option would be to cut down the big tree and plant a smaller one a bit farther from the house. Just my advice.
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Simon (Simon)
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Username: Simon

Post Number: 2
Registered: 09-2009
Posted on Sunday, September 06, 2009 - 11:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So there is a danger of loosening fibers even with a low pressure spray to apply the chlorine bleach? Is there an equally effective treatment, but less dangerous method--such as steam? On the tree, I can only clean out the deadwood and cut back one major limb that's overhanging the roof, but that should help let more sunlight in. More extensive pruning would kill the tree which is very old and large--complete removal is estimated at $5000. In any case, I have to decide on a quicker treatment for the moss than sunlight, although that would help in the long term, because it's not currently insurable. Or, perhaps, I should just give up and look for a moss-free house.
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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 232
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Saturday, September 05, 2009 - 09:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The problem is not the slate, but the tree. When you spray that off, you are going to have a bunch of loose asbestos particles all around. If you cut down the tree and let the "sun shine in", I believe most of the moss will cook on the roof and a lot of it will die. It is going to be expensive to take it off depending on where you live, so make sure and allow for that expense. If it isn't leaking, I would imagine you have another 10 15 years or more left on it if you leave it alone. Hard to say. Good luck!
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Simon (Simon)
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Posted on Saturday, September 05, 2009 - 02:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm considering whether to buy an older (100 yrs +) house and just discovered a few problems. It has cement asbestos tiles, much of which is covered with moss. The insurance agent wants the moss removed before issuing a policy. I have read methods for dealing with a situation like this--I'm leaning towards hiring a roof cleaner experienced in such projects. He uses a diluted chlorine bleach solution with a low pressure spray which he will use from a bucket lift or ladder. I realize this is not the most environmentally friendly method, but is it effective and for how long? I will be clearing out an overhanging tree and may spray on a fungicide annually to keep the moss from coming back. The contractor guessed the roof will look white/gray after cleaning. The other issue is the condition of the tile--one fell off and I measured it as a 1/4" in thickness. Is it reasonable to guess that the other tiles have the same thickness and, if so, approximately how much life does it have left? While the roof shows no signs of leaking right now, if we need to replace it in the next few years, we could factor that into the purchase negotiations. Thanks in advance for any help.

moss on rooffront of tileback of tile

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