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Sara (Sara)
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Username: Sara

Post Number: 6
Registered: 12-2011
Posted on Thursday, February 23, 2012 - 06:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Old School, I do like the look of the roof, dark grey w/lichen exc for the orange sap stains on SE corner. I don't know yet what City requires for new roof in city limits. If it's dwn to felt, I will hv to find somone to repair it. I do hv a leak, I thnk in wall just under ridge on E side of hse. So I do hv to do smthing. Tks again
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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 792
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Wednesday, February 22, 2012 - 09:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sara, I have not seen the roof or pictures of it, but if it is not leaking, it is a prime candidate for leaving it. I am sure you will replace it before it needs to be because i sounds like you don't like the "look"

I suppose you could go over it with a metal roof, but I don't think I would do that myself. I would tear it off, and that is going to be expensive. The big problem is I don't know the local conditions or codes.
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Sara (Sara)
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Post Number: 5
Registered: 12-2011
Posted on Tuesday, February 21, 2012 - 07:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Old School, I sent Scottie Ballantyne's contact info to my ins adj. He is slate roofer in Garland, TX, nr Dlls prob nearst 2 us, ~200 m. may gv est on repair. My ins wl cvr sme if we do that. I will def take your advice to mind and I so appreciate you tkng time to share it with me. I am so ignorant abt this. Thks again!
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Sara (Sara)
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Username: Sara

Post Number: 4
Registered: 12-2011
Posted on Tuesday, February 21, 2012 - 06:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Old School, I am in NE Texas abt 50 m frm Shreveport, LA. So u thnk I cld jst lve it as is?? Needs some facia repair 4 holes. I ws nt thinking of remvng the roof tho, either repairing or putting a 26 gge steel roof > it. Do you hve any opinion on whether or not that wld be ok? I also wish I cld get orange stains off the SE side. I hv D2 biological solution tht wks grt on granite tombstones, shld wk on slate, nt sure on asbstos tile. Do u know if it works on tht too? TY
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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 791
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Tuesday, February 21, 2012 - 06:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sara, if it was leaking, you would see it no matter how much insulation was up there. the chipped corners are no big deal because it was not uncommon to have the corners clipped to give the roofs some design. We do that with regular slate all the time. As far as the lichen on the roof, that is also something that really doesn't bother that slate very much. Maybe in another 20 years or so it will get through the slates, but that is tough stuff.

You will pay a fortune to have that old asbestos stripped off and disposed of. If it was mine, I would consider leaving it alone. Where are you located?
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Sara (Sara)
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Username: Sara

Post Number: 3
Registered: 12-2011
Posted on Tuesday, February 21, 2012 - 07:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Old School, not in house but my father had excess insulation mat'l blown into attic so I fear that any leaks may be on top of it. There are leaks from the decayed wood trim just below. Tried to find someone to repair that sev yrs back & gave up after sev unsuccessful attempts. Also we know of no roofer in area who will do repairs on asbestos tile. Thank you for your reply.
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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 790
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Monday, February 20, 2012 - 10:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sara, does it leak?
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Sara (Sara)
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Username: Sara

Post Number: 2
Registered: 12-2011
Posted on Monday, February 20, 2012 - 08:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I hv 1948 asbestos tile roof that hs lost 2-4 ridge tiles on bth ends of main gable & 1 brkn field tile & many tiles with corners missing likely hail damage. Roof hs hd no lost tiles b4 this year. Were told @ 1967 purchase this was a lifetime roof needing no repair. So until these msg tiles, it was never examined. The roof is covered w/lichen. It resembles ACRM05 tile sample except 4 smooth outer edge not jagged, w/binoculars. My ins adj & I r leaning to replacing roof with metal roof. My roofer prefers securing metal roof to rafters directly not putting wooden strip layer between. Wld you hv any advice on this? + or -? Thank you!
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Linda Kral
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Username: Rainbow

Post Number: 2
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Saturday, January 19, 2008 - 01:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey guys, thanks for responding. The roof was installed in 1935 when the house was built. We believe they also had the same roof on the guest house out back but replaced it with regular roofing as there is a stack of the asbestos things out back and we think they may have used some to do a fix on the main house.We found a Johns Mansfield wrapper in the attic, stating they are "asbestos slate tiles". I shall try attached photos. Taken today out of a 2nd story window. We have had no problem and yes, it is very dry here. We have lived here for 2 1/2 years and can count the rains we have had on two hands, and we have had a couple of hail storms and a couple of snows...otherwise, it is dry here.Thanks for your help... If you can't open photo, e mail me at linda@kralspaces.com roof
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Walter Musson
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Username: Walter_musson

Post Number: 35
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Saturday, January 19, 2008 - 06:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

70 year life span for those tiles is close to their useful life in the Northeast, but your climate if drier might mean there is still 10- 20 years left.
Post some resized pictures here if you need more help.
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David Spradlin
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Username: David_spradlin

Post Number: 10
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Friday, January 18, 2008 - 09:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

When was the roof installed?
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Linda Kral
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Username: Rainbow

Post Number: 1
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Friday, January 18, 2008 - 07:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

First of all...is anyone still looking at this site...the posts are pretty old?

We need some solid information to give a prospective buyer of our 1935 home in Roswell, New Mexico. No one around here knows anything and i keep getting the run around from those I have contacted on line...we found the paper showing we have John Mansfield Asbestos tiles on our roof. They are hard and heavy. The only thing we see are broken corners, otherwise, they look good, though faded. Our buyer was told they only have 3-5 years left...our sale is hinging on what assurances we can give our buyer as to the remaining life. Answer here and please e-mail me at linda@kralspaces.com. We need to give some info to the buyer asap.
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David Spradlin
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Username: David_spradlin

Post Number: 3
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Wednesday, June 20, 2007 - 10:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tom, I'd be happy to come out and take a look at your roof for you. There's not a lot of asbestos roofs left around there. We're based out of Loomis, but my partner runs our satallite shop out of Livermore. I myself spent 22 years in Castro Valley and we continue to do a lot of work in the Bay Area. I look forward to hearing from you.
David Spradlin
Ryder Roofing
Office: (800)510-3761
Cell: (925)917-0355
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Tom B
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Username: Teknobear

Post Number: 1
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Tuesday, June 19, 2007 - 10:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am purchasing a vintage home that has asbestos concrete tiles (diamond shape) on the roof. There are a few places where the tiles are broken and/or missing. I currently don't have the estimated 23K to replace the entire roof, so now I'm looking for alternatives.

Are there any contractors in the SF Bay area that fix these roofs?
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Wayne Elliott
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Username: Elliott

Post Number: 1
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Monday, April 23, 2007 - 09:37 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hello, this is my first time to post on this forum. I have learned much from reading the other questions and answers, but I have a special situation. I have a house that has been given to me, but I have to move it. You guessed it, asbestos tile roof. Now I understad it is ok for me to take it off myself as long as I don't use employees. After taking it off, however, some of the posts say they then become "hazardous Materials". How are they bought and sold and transported then? Can I take them off, stack them, transport them when I move the house, and put them back on without bending too many laws. Also, can they be put on plywood sheathing over felt paper, and what is the minimum pitch for these. Right now, the roof is a 12 on 12, but I would like to reduce this. Any Advice on this stuff? Also, What is the average value for one shingle (gray/pink 16 x 16) if I could sell it?
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steven smith
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Username: Scottish_slater

Post Number: 2
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 13, 2007 - 12:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

asbestos/fiber cement slate are pure rubbish ,there crap to install crap to walk on when wet and murder to maintain stay well clear stick to slate or tile
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Melissa Miks
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Username: Mismokids

Post Number: 2
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Monday, February 05, 2007 - 09:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Joe, Thanks for your response. No, the roofers scraped them off onto the driveway, not knowing their value. Now I have a mess. Any further suggestions for disposal? Thank you. Melissa
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Joe Jenkins
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Username: Joe

Post Number: 57
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 12:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Melissa, If the shingles were reusable and if you took them off without breaking them, they have resale value. We have a thread on this message board of people selling asbestos tiles.
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Melissa Miks
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Username: Mismokids

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Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Saturday, February 03, 2007 - 10:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I understand a homeowner can remove an asbestos roof, which is what we did. But now we don't know where to dispose of it. Where do I start to find a place. I am super poor, so to call the State and have them fine me, would be awful, but I want to dispose of them correctly. I live in West Virginia near the Md, Pa, Va borders, if that helps. Thanks.
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brian beni
Posted on Thursday, November 02, 2006 - 09:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wanted 12x12 diamond pattern grey tiles to install on a new building in a tiled historic complex of buildings in westchester New york. Roof is 48 x14 with a 7 on 12 pitch. A knowledgable roofer is also required. Top dollar paid Please contact Brian at Benistonebarn@aol.com
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Wednesday, March 07, 2001 - 12:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We work on asbestos roofs as a small part of our overall restoration work (about 2%). Asbestos shingles (which are *not* asbestos "slates") make a good roof and are long lasting. Asbestos is carcinogenic, however, if friable and breathed into the lungs. Asbestos shingles are not friable unless crumbled up, crushed, or broken. So the roofs are not dangerous or a health hazard, nor do they pose an environmental threat. However, when removed, they often fall under EPA and OSHA restrictions for the removal of toxic material. These restrictions can be burdensome (air monitoring, breathing apparatus, moon suits, proper disposal). For this reason alone, it is a good idea to maintain and repair your asbestos roof if you have one (rather than remove and replace it). Of course, homeowners and independent contractors without employees are not subject to OSHA regulations and can remove the roof themselves. Repair is similar to slate roof repair - slate rippers are used to get the broken tiles out, Pearson slate cutters cut asbestos tiles nicely, and they can be refastened in a manner similar to slate, depending on the shape of the asbestos tile (although asbestos tiles can not be punched like slate - they must be drilled). Please add any questions about asbestos roofs below.
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Godsil
Posted on Tuesday, March 13, 2001 - 10:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I removed my first asbestos tile roof in St. Louis, Mo., 1962, my junior year in highschool. From then until about 1992 I probably spent a month of workdays removing asbestos tiles, without wearing masks until about 1980, then wearing those 3M masks with two yellow bands. I often wondered weather the tiny white flakes that accumulated on the roofs or in the gutters were that which would f... my lungs. Or something smaller than that?
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2001 - 01:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think it's a good idea to wear respiratory protection when removing asbestos roofs.
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Ken McFarlane
Posted on Sunday, May 13, 2001 - 06:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We have a house roofed with diamond-shaped thin tiles that I am pretty sure are asbetos tiles. The roof is in great shape in general, but there are several edge tiles that were damaged by trees and careless guttering, etc.and one piece of round tile at the top of a gable is broken. Is there a source for replacement tiles? We can 't find any locally here in Detroit.
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Monday, May 14, 2001 - 11:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You need to specify the exact size of the tiles and their color (some were originally red, some light gray, etc.) before anyone can tell you whether or not they have any. They are not available new from retail outlets, but may be available salvaged. I have some new ones, for example, in my stockyard (and some salvaged ones), but not a lot of them. I have various sizes.
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David Williams
Posted on Monday, June 04, 2001 - 06:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am considering buying a large two story home constructed in 1965 with an asbestos roof according to the preious owner. The tiles are light gray in color and looked (at least to me)like slate. From your orignal post, I assume you'd recommend keeping the roof, but what signs should I look for to determine if they are crushed or otherwise pose a health hazard? It's a fairly large roof with a good pitch so I'm not likely to inspect it myself. What questions should I ask of a local roofing contractor to determine if he is qualified to inspect or repair it? Thanks for your help.
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Monday, June 04, 2001 - 11:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It's unlikely that any portion of the roof would be crushed or pose a health hazard. Crushed tiles would leak. I do recommend keeping an asbestos roof, if you can. Ask your local roofing contractor if he has worked on this sort of roof before. Asbestos roofs are pretty rare and most production (asphalt installation) roofers don't work on them. You may be able to visually inspect it as well as anyone. Use a pair of binoculars if you have to and look for broken or missing tiles. If the tiles are diamond shaped (it doesn't sound like it), they can be cracked and the cracks will be invisible (hairline) unless you put your face right up to the tile. However, the rectangular asbestos tiles are easier to spot if broken. Good luck.
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Joe B
Posted on Monday, June 11, 2001 - 02:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have a friend who wants to Powerwash & paint his asbestos roof so it will look "cleaner" is this possible?
He said he can use a product called "Somay's Roof Paint System"
Is it prudent to do this?
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Jim Germond
Posted on Monday, June 11, 2001 - 10:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm not sure about the paint, but from what I have heard about Powerwashing (at least with slate), he had best wash from the top down or it may be a case of "Houston, we have lift-off."
-Jim
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Kelly
Posted on Wednesday, June 13, 2001 - 11:17 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We have a light gray, diamond shaped asbestos rooftop on our home, which is in excellent shape. It doesn't look so good though, it kind of looks 'mossy' in places. My first question is what is the best way to clean it? Powerwashing is an option but it is high pitched and then with what cleaning agent? Second, could it be painted and how long before the paint fades or chips? Finally, I'd like to put copper strips at the ridges and valley just for looks? How would you attach them and do you foresee any problems in doing so? Thanks!
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Wednesday, June 13, 2001 - 11:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Old asbestos roofs, although still quite serviceable, can look pretty stained, especially from leaf fall from overhanging trees. The problem with cleaning them is that the tiles are very brittle and crack if someone walks on them or puts their weight on them. Power washing, I would think, should be done from above in a downward direction or else you will get a house full of water. The trick is finding someone who can spray the roof from above without damaging it. It may be just as well to leave it the way it is. Painting it would probably be a disaster.

The copper ridge and flashing idea is good, however, because copper oxide prevents molds and mildews from growing on the roof. The oxide washes down the roof and actually keeps it clean. You can attach copper ridge to diamond shaped asbestos by drilling the ridge and asbestos in place (about every 12") and then nailing with a copper roofing nail (I use 2.5"). Then caulk the nailhead with lifetime clear silicon caulk (try GE Silicon II). It's hard to nail through asbestos without breaking it unless you drill it first (and you need to use a masonry drill bit on the asbestos, which will *not* drill through the copper - you have to use a regular drill bit on the copper). The original valleys must be removed to be replaced with copper ones. This involves removing the tiles on either side of the valley, pulling out the old metal, installing the new copper valley, and replacing the tiles in their original positions (same procedure as for a slate roof).

Finally, the copper oxide routine may clean your roof. You may be able to spray the roof with a copper spray from an agricultural store (used for orchard sprays) and that *may* kill the molds, mildews, and moss that are discoloring the roof. This is just a theory.
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John Hund
Posted on Monday, June 18, 2001 - 06:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My name is John Hund and I work with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Atlanta, GA. I received a phone call from a person who had a leak in his asbestos slate(A/S)roof and asked me what he should do. The house was built in 1947. I told the person that it would be much cheaper to repair the roof that to replace it. Removing A/S shingles could run $10/sq. ft. and would have to be removed by a licensed asbestos contractor. Could you help me locate a roofing contractor in the Atlanta area that could do this repair? Thank you.
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Mike Martin
Posted on Tuesday, July 03, 2001 - 06:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I live in Texas and found a beautiful 1950's home that has an asbestos roof. I assume it's slate? The roof resembles wood shingles from a distance and the shingles/slates are hard as...slate but seem to be in good shape. What are these? Slates or Shingles and does the presence of asbestos signal no-go no matter the condition?
Thanks, Mike
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Tuesday, July 03, 2001 - 06:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Asbestos and slate are two entirely different things. Asbestos shingles are made by humans from asbestos and some sort of cement; slate shingles are slabs of stone split out of rock. Some people call asbestos shingles "asbestos slate," which is erroneous. Asbestos is not slate.

Asbestos shingles do, however make a long lasting roof and are far superior to asphalt products in longevity. Have you looked at the photos on this site? Some are asbestos.
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Chris C.
Posted on Tuesday, July 03, 2001 - 09:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We have a house built in 1928 with a light gray, diamond shaped asbestos shingle roof. A few of the shingles have some small holes (about the diameter of a pencil) and seem to be the source of some leaks. I know that we could have the shingles replaced, but finding a reputable and dependable roofer in our area (that works with asbestos shingles) has proven to be very difficult. Can I repair the holes? I have been told that bondo (an auto body repair product) can be used. Is this true? Any suggestions?
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Friday, July 06, 2001 - 05:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You can use GE Silicon II clear lifetime caulk. Don't walk on or step on the tiles in the process though. Use a hook ladder.
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Joy Breckenridge
Posted on Sunday, July 22, 2001 - 12:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I noticed that the parts of the questions that pertained to the safety factor with asbestos shingles is being ignored in your responses. I'm thinking of buying a house with asbestos shingles, but I'm hesitant to do so because of safety and cost concerns. Should I avoid making an offer for a house because of the asbestos shingles?
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Dave Snyder
Posted on Sunday, July 22, 2001 - 02:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Joy, Asbestos roofs were a very long lasting roof. Some are in great shape today others are not. If you have a home that you art looking to purchase it would be very wise to have a very good slater look it over so that they can give you a description of its future life and possible needs. Generally a lot of these roofs are still in good shape although a lot of them are not. I would never purchase a home with one w/o inspection! And your general layman best not do the inspecting. The hazards pertaining to them is moe in the governing regulations that has been adapted by most states that if the roof need replaced entirely then the cost can be from double to four times the replacement cost of any other type. Because of the need to pay for certified asbestos removal. Most states allow homeowners to remove and handle them on thier own if they wish and in that case you will only be paying out as if replacing any roof. On the other hand if the roof is in good condition you may have some or no need to repair and could get a roof that has another 25 to 50 years life left with slight maintanence. I would beware of guys that want to repair you to death as well as contractors that want to remove it as well. Very important to have a good inspection. Where are you located? If you can find someone close to you that can do this well then great. Otherwise to start I would get some good pictures of the building and roof and forward them on to someone to offer advice on your direction. call 814 455 7430 if you need more help. Thank You, Dave Snyder www.slateandcopper.com
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Ron Tucker
Posted on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 01:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have the red diamond asbestos tiles, which are 70 years old and I'm trying to decide if I should replace them or not. I want to put new copper gutters up, and the old gutters have integrated flashing that go's up and under the tiles quite a ways. I tried to remove one of the nails and I broke the corner off of the tile. Ugh.. Also, I'm removing the old chimney from the roof due to remodeling needs and power vented appliances. And that's going to cause a large hole that needs patched. I had real bad Ice dams last winter and all of the end pieces are out of wack and have lots of clipped corners. The roof is also severely discolored. So, I'm trying to talk myself into replacing the roof. What does anyone think? I would replace it with the owens corning pvc slate roof. What do you think of that product?

Thanks
ROn Tucker
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 09:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you're going to replace it, replace it with slate.

Everything you mention about the asbestos roof can be repaired. However, you would need a supply of matching tiles. If you don't have them, then you should determine whether there is an area you can cannabalize on the existing roof such as a dormer side roof or back porch roof or some relatively unseen roof section. Use the tiles removed from this section to repair the rest of the roof, then re-roof the cannabalized section (with used slate, perhaps).
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rontucker
Posted on Tuesday, August 14, 2001 - 01:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Joe, I have decided to replace the roof with slate, I bought your book and It's got my fired up. How do I know if my roof can handle the weight of slate?

Thanks
Ron Tucker
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joe jenkins
Posted on Tuesday, August 14, 2001 - 01:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

When was the house built? Houses built of traditional methods prior to the 1960s generally have solid roofs that can hold slate or anything else. Low-slope (4:12) more modern ranch houses, truss roofs with plywood or OSB roof decks, or 2x4 rafter systems of softwoods, are all roof styles that I wouldn't put slate on. If your house is older and the roof is still square and not excessively sagging anywhere, and you have board sheathing (not plywood), and the rafters are bigger than 2x4s, then you can probably put slate on it. That said, I can show you a 130 year old house with 2x4 rafters and the original slate roof, in good condition. The rafters are oak and the spans are short, with collar bracing and knee walls. So there are a lot of variables with roofs.
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Ed
Posted on Tuesday, September 04, 2001 - 05:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just completed the walk through of a home inspection and just received the "Asbestos shock". The dreaded a-word. The two previous owners' disclosures and one previous inspection described the original roof on the 1920 home for which I have a purchase agreement as slate. My home inspector has set me straight. The very well maintained home has a very well maintained asbestos roof. To quote the inspector, "An 80 year old roof has no right to look that good". The inspector estimates that properly maintained the roof has another 20-30 years of life, but here exists a couple dilemma. Most of the local Rochester, MN roofers won't touch an asbestos roof, so can I even get the roof repaired? When I try to sell this home in 5-8 years will I have to knock $30,000 off the selling price to pay for a roof with only 10-20 years left on it? Even a lifetime roof has a life expectancy. Am I too near the end of this roofs life to be paying top dollar for an otherwise beautiful home? The current owner was surprised to learn of the building material, but on future disclosures I will have no choice, but to sell it as an asbestos roof. Any words of advise would be appreciated, but I have a ticking contingency inspection. Thank you.
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Larry D. Saylor
Posted on Tuesday, January 29, 2002 - 08:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am wondering if 1/8th inch roofing with SVK made in Belgium is an Asbestos Roofing Material it is made in the shape of old staple lock that is diamond shape. This roofing shingle looks like it is made of cement and ?
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Herman
Posted on Friday, March 15, 2002 - 04:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am looking at purchasing a beautiful old home that will need much work. I have been told by the current owner that the roof is made of asbestos and is covering an original cedar shake. Even though the current owner denies any leaks, there is evidence inside the house.

I know this board does not recommend replacing this type of roof, however I would like to restore the home to its original cedar shake roof.

What is the process for replacement? Can you give me an idea of cost vs. standard tear-off in a percentage basis? Any other recommendations.
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Sunday, March 17, 2002 - 04:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wood shakes were used as a temporary roof covering until something better came along,like slate. The shakes were often left on the roof and the slates (or, in your case, asbestos) roofing was installed directly over the shakes. I don't think it's advisable to return to the shake roof. You'd probably be best off financially by restoring the asbestos. Otherwise, I'd recommend replacing it with a new slate roof.
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Walter Musson
Posted on Monday, March 18, 2002 - 07:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Removal of the whole asbestos roof may require you to notify the DEP and to have a licensed contractor remove and dispose of it in a secure landfill.It can add up to a large sum of money,but if you truly want the wood roof then only you can decide if it's worth it.Once the asbestos is gone,you'd still be facing removal of the wooden roof,since its full of nail penetrations.Finally you'd be back at square one,ready for installation of the new cedar roof.In total it could be a costly job ,even if you're willing to do some of the work yourself.
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Tim Dittmar
Posted on Tuesday, March 19, 2002 - 08:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I recommend trying to go back and pick up the trend of decision making with the building of this house and esp. the roof. Many shake roofs are roofed over because of having a open or gapped deck(unsuitable for the new covering if shakes are removed?) Asbestos is also lightweight as it's commonly single-coverage and thin too. These type choices aren't always happenstance- at times, the skimping can be rampant(some refer to these as "spec" houses) and the decision/s tend to weight/money saving on the front end and damn the "bag-holder". I'd survey in some detail the load-bearing ability of the rafter/deck system before moving forward to the making of choice- observe gravity deflection of the rafters, spacing and sizing, completion of decking, etc. as, for example, a slate roof will dramatically add to the load on the rafter/deck structure- how well is the lighter load being borne now?
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David C. Ehlert
Posted on Thursday, June 13, 2002 - 10:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Greetings. I am the Chairperson of a Building Committee for a Church in Fresno, California. We have an Asbestos Shingled Roof that is in excellent condition (read this as no leaks). The Main Church building was built in the mid to late 1950's with an extension that was built in 1982.

We are currently experiencing two issues with the roof.

1. There is a perceived opinion that because we have a "two-toned" roof (due to the age difference) that it needs to be replaced.

2. Our Church faces East to West, so there is "mold" & "mildew" on the north facing portion of the roof.

We are looking at different options such as treating the mold and mildew with a bleach solution, to encasing the roof, utilizing some sort of coating material, or just plain replacing it.

In reading the previous posts, I see something about "copper oxide"..?? How is this applied and can we spray it to treat the mold and mildew..??

Any help would be appreciated...

David Ehlert
Peace Lutheran Church
Fresno, California

P.S. Please either respond here or to my e-mail address of ehlerts@attbi.com.
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joe jenkins
Posted on Thursday, June 13, 2002 - 12:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Copper oxide kills molds and mildews, as evident by the lack of such below copper flashings on roofs. It's sold at agricultural supply places as orchard sprays (copper sulfate) or algicides for ponds. It's not toxic and you can even buy copper soap for orchard use as an organic spray. I don't know anyone who has tried spraying it on a roof, but it seems like it would be preferable to a bleach. Bleach (chlorine) is toxic and who knows what it will make your roof look like. So it may be worth a try.
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Anonymous
Posted on Monday, July 22, 2002 - 12:11 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

MY HOUSE WAS HIT BY PEA SIZE HAIL, WHAT TIPE OF DAMAGE SHOULD I LOOK FOR ON ASBESTOS SHINGLES? WILL HAIL DAMAGE A SHINGLE EVEN IF IT DOES NOT CHIP OR BRAKE IT?
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admin
Posted on Monday, July 22, 2002 - 12:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There is probably no damage. What you would see is cracked tiles if anything.
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Phil Jones
Posted on Monday, August 26, 2002 - 07:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This is a little further afield. France in fact where I can find no reliable source of information. I come from Wales (UK) where slate is almost universally used for it durability.

I bought my house from a collegue who swore the roof had been replaced. He is no builder and had clearly been 'ripped off' himself for more then one piece of work on the house.

Whatever, my inspection of the underside of the roof showed that all the timbers had been replaced. Large rough-cut timbers and well-laid solid battens, all new. So far so good.

But no insulation. Strange that becasue not only is France strict about insulation (sorry, very strict), our location in the Alps makes for expensive heating bills.

The underside of the tiles were smooth and clean and being my collegue and friend trused his word from that point so did not inspect the topside. Everthing I saw underneath looked good. No stains to indictate leaks on either the batten or wooden floor. I knew the house had remained empty for about five years.

The first Autumn saw me cleaning leaves out of the guttering. No big deal save the amount of moss growing on the tiles. I couldnt recall ever seeing much of that before but coming from a relativly polluted Wales assumed that the sulphur-sensitive moss would not have grown in Wales anyway.

Some time later, about a year and the first leak. On inspection I found that a large area of tiles had started to disintegrate badly on BOTH sides.

They will have to be replaced, no question. But what could have caused such rapid deterioation? Several years I can understand but this has happened over 18 months.

Any ideas?

My collegue was particularly distressed to hear of this and was quick to produce the receipts for the work done. A company that has since gone out of buisness..ha ha.
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Ann Clemmer
Posted on Tuesday, November 19, 2002 - 11:11 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Help!! I wish I had found this site sooner, but I owned a home that needed asbestos shingles repaired, but could not find a roofer to do so in the northeast corner of Arkansas. This instigated an insurance claim, which was denied. My home was of excellent construction, built in 1939. A traditional Cape Cod with a steep roof line (10/12 most likely). I have since sold the home--for a much reduced price, due to missing roof shingles. Help me win an argument with my insurance company which says that the roof was old, and therefore, they would not honor the "replacement cost" feature of my policy. I am arguing that I could have reasonably expected my roof to last at least another 20 years--the life of a normal modern roof. Please help by responding with info I can take to my state insurance commission--if you have experience or qualifications, please add these to strength your opinion and my case. I can't thank you enough. My e-mail address is: avclemmer@ualr.edu.
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Curtis Tomme
Posted on Saturday, November 23, 2002 - 12:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am looking at buying a house built in Abilene, TX in 1939. I had the house inspected and the inspector said I had a slate roof. To make sure it was okay with my insurance, the insurance company had it inspected and the insurance inspector said I had an asbestos slate roof, which after reviewing the boards is erroneous. How do I tell which one I have? And if it is an asbestos roof, what is the expense in repairing the roof?
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Tim Dittmar
Posted on Saturday, November 23, 2002 - 07:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Curt? - an asbestos "tile" roof of that age would probably be "sloughing"(sluffing) asbestos fibers- wispy, cottony, feathery tufts from its surface- there'd be, likely and in addition, a large growth of lichen-looking matter in clumps, etc. and particularly on the roof faces not exposed to large amounts of sunlight- sorta' a yellowish-greenish fuzzy accretion- in cross section, asbestos-portland cement matrix shingles resemble strongly graham crackers(in cross section)- both in dimension and texture- there's additionally a strong uniformity of appearance from shingle to shingle. I suspect the insurance "dude" is correct in his assessment of your roof- slate shingles are usually thicker, less likely to support growths, more rugged, heavier, and have some measure of individual appearance not to mention a non-squarecut edge. And, looking at the edge(gable-rake) of the roof, it's more likely that a slate roof would be two-three layers thick whereas asbestos shingle roofs are often one-two layers thick(single-coverage). The bad news, asbestos roofs are generally known to have shorter lives(50-70 yrs) than slate roofs(75-150+ yrs)- not that yours is a total loss but that it's become extremely fragile, porous, crumbly, etc. and, being single coverage, most any other than the most casual of damage to shingle/s could be suspected as having leak potential- too bad the insurance guy didn't make a few more comments- informed as he was... hope this helps- let us know what may have not been addressed fully enough. Wear a mask. at least, to strain out the asbestos fibers when "messing with" the roof.
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admin
Posted on Tuesday, November 26, 2002 - 03:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Email a photo of the roof to mail@jenkinsslate.com and we will tell you if it's slate or asbestos. Get a close-up shot.
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Anonymous
Posted on Saturday, December 28, 2002 - 09:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

hello there.
i am considering purchasing a home with asbestos roofing.one crack do exist ,could till by leak mark on ceiling.
The house was built in 1952.

i am wondering how many more years i can get out of this roof.

thanx.
joe sas.
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admin
Posted on Sunday, December 29, 2002 - 11:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A 50 year old asbestos roof is usually only about half way through its life, depending on the maintenance and/or abuse it has received over its first 50 years.
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Rob Maczuga
Posted on Thursday, January 16, 2003 - 04:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi, I am considering the purchase of an asbestos shingled roof in Dekalb Co, Georgia. The roof has obvious leaks and is probably around 80 years old. Can I simply fix the roof or is it nessasary to replace it?
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Walter Musson
Posted on Wednesday, January 22, 2003 - 06:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It's difficult to know if replacement is needed without seeing pictures of the roof.Although 80 years is getting on towards the end of an asbestos roofs useful life,if its properly repaired you might get another 10 -15 years out of it.In the Northeast ,with Winters freeze thaw cycles most 80 year asbestos roofs are close to needing to be replaced.With a warmer climate there you can expect less wear than here.
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Trevor
Posted on Friday, April 11, 2003 - 11:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am currently thinking about buying a house built in 1945. The disclosure form states that the roof is slate but I'm worried that it might be asbestos since I have been told that that was used heavely in that time period. How can I tell the difference between the two? Also a few of the roof tiles are broken on the edges. Will this pose a problem? There is no signs of leakage from the inside. I was also informed that slate roofs should be painted. This has been and the paint is now peeling off. Does it need to be repainted?
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Joe
Posted on Thursday, April 17, 2003 - 01:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Identify slate at http://www.jenkinsslate.com/identify.html

Look at asbestos roofs at http://www.jenkinsslate.com/photos_asbestos.htm

NEVER paint a slate roof!
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Alex P
Posted on Friday, May 30, 2003 - 04:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have a house built in 1947 with an asbestos tile roof in the New Orleans area that leaks during really bad weather, and really looks worn. I have seen leaks in more than one spot inside my attics. I have been unable to find any contractors willing to repair it, and pretty much resigned to have it replaced. Here's my problem: The contractor says the decking behind it is 1x with 1/8"-1/2" gaps, so in order to use regular shingles, redecking is needed. Are there any other type of shingles / slates that will be able to make use of the existing decking? Redecking adds so much to cost of installing regular shingles, that I would rather spend the money in better roofing material. Thanks!
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admin
Posted on Saturday, May 31, 2003 - 02:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

1/8" to 1/2" gaps in the roof decking are *not* a problem for slate roofs.
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Sean Shevlin
Posted on Monday, June 16, 2003 - 04:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I own a house built in 1930 that I believe contains asbestos tiles. It resembles the picture of side-lap tiles I found on your website. Since the roof is already 70 years old how many more years can I expect to get out of it? I have talked to inspectors who have said it could cost upwards of $8 sq ft to remove. Would this include disposal? Can you direct me to a website where I can found out the rules for removing the tiles? Thanks.
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Melissa
Posted on Friday, June 20, 2003 - 08:43 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am interested in a house that has asbestos tiles. The house was built in the forties. There is moss growing on some of the tile but I find that makes the tudor style house maintain its character. My question is I have two children and will be living in the house with my husband. Will the slate pose any health risks to them? ALso this is a gorgous house and for three years it has been on the market and I have patiently waited until the opportunity presented itself and now it has. BUt the realtors told me the reason it was having trouble selling is because of the asbestos roof. Do you think that people hear that word and immediatly see men in space suits and huge dollar signs? I had no idea about slate or roofs at all until I did a little research. Should I be afraid of this or embrace it?
Melissa
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admin
Posted on Friday, June 20, 2003 - 09:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Asbestos roofs are not slate roofs. They are *totally* different. "Asbestos slate" is a misnomer. There is no such thing.

Asbestos roofs are long lasting roofs, as was stated at the beginning of this thread. You didn't say how old the house is. If it's 90 years or older, then the asbestos roof may be needing either attenion or replacement.
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Walter Musson
Posted on Saturday, June 21, 2003 - 02:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Melissa,
Moss is not a good sign on an asbestos roof,it's an indication of a softening of the tiles,and therefore a step closer to having to take remedial action.Although your prospective home is only 60 years old or so,it seems other potential buyers have been hesitant to take it off the market.Your broker may be right that the roof has scared them so that they haven't made an offer.
I'm a Realtor in Maine,as well as a slater,and here you could make an offer with earnest money down,but make it subject to the home inspection,or more to the point,a qualified roofer to inspect the asbestos roof.That gives you an out if the inspection is not satisfactory to you.It also might give you leverage if the roof needs replacement at a cost of 20,000,then you could ask for concessions from the owner.If it's been on the market for that long then they might be receptive to your reduced offer if you have a qualified inspection report to back up your position.
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Walter Musson
Posted on Saturday, June 21, 2003 - 02:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sean,
Check with your State Bureau of Enviromental Protection for regulations on asbestos roofing removal and disposal.They might have a database of licensed abatement contractors in your region that you could contact for an accurate price on removal and disposal costs for you roof.They can tell you the State requirements for what you need to do.In Maine it's legal for the homeowner to remove it themselves,but must still be taken to a licensed disposal facility.
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Chuck Schott
Posted on Friday, July 18, 2003 - 08:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi -- I recently purchased a house in central Iowa with an asbestos roof. It seems to be in good conditon, except in one little area where the previous owner replaced a couple of shingles with what appears to be galvanized tin cut the size of shingles. The house has absolutely no leaks, but the roof was very dirty, discolored, and had a little fungus growing. I have power washed it, and it looks like new, and I did not find any cracked or damaged shingles other than the above mentioned areas. Is there any supplier in the midwest that handles any type of replacement, or "look alike" shingles? I also have a separate single car garage, roofed with asbestos, and I could remove that roof, and save those shingles for future repairs. Your thoughts and comments please?
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admin
Posted on Tuesday, July 22, 2003 - 10:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Have you checked the "sources of asbestos tiles" page on this web site?

http://www.jenkinsslate.com/asbestos-tiles.html

If you can't find what you need for sale you will have to cannabalize from your garage or other part of an existing roof.

Joe Jenkins
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Tuesday, September 09, 2003 - 10:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just noticed that the "Gardens Alive" catalog includes "Moss Aside" which is described as a quick and natural moss killer that is suitable for use on roofs - the active ingredient being a soap-based herbicide.

http://www.gardensalive.com
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David Hostetler
Posted on Sunday, September 14, 2003 - 10:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I recently purchased a home with an asbestos tile roof (diamond shaped tiles). The attached two-car garage has a separate roof which is asphalt shingles and needs to be replaced. Does anyone make an asphalt shingle which resembles diamond asbestos tiles? Thanks.
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mike jeanette
Posted on Sunday, September 21, 2003 - 05:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

i have replacement pieces for your roof, email me mrjusa@yahoo.com
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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, November 25, 2003 - 03:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have an asbestos roof that had some chiped shingles and some cracked shingles. I don't know the total square footage of the roof but my home sq footage is close to 3500 sq. ft. I had a person who claims to specialize in asbestos repair give me an estimate to repair the cracked & broken shingles and recover two flat roofs with a Rubber material (Mule-Hyde) for $15,000.00. Does this price sound reasonable or ? Thank you
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admin
Posted on Tuesday, November 25, 2003 - 08:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How big are the flat roofs?
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m.c. griffin
Posted on Tuesday, April 13, 2004 - 09:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have about 5 or 6 hundred 16in dimond shap shingles and some ridge cap ( new ) I bought of an old ware house about 20 years ago I would like to sell
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admin
Posted on Wednesday, April 14, 2004 - 12:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How do we contact you?
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Steve A
Posted on Wednesday, April 21, 2004 - 06:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Has anyone here had experience with either "Mule-Hyde or GenFlex roofing material? I have a flat roof that needs to be recovered, and I'm sick and tired of using "rolled roofing" which needs to be replaced within 5 to 8 yrs. I suffer with "ice damming" followed by leakage during winter months and have installed "heat wires". The wires prevent damming, but make it impossible for me to remove heavy snow from the roof using a roof rake. I was told by a roofer, who I called in for an estimate, that these two roofing "membrane products" are long lasting, seamless when installed properly, and eliminate the need for "heat wires". Any information from someone speaking either through personal experience or professional knowledge would be greatly appreciated! THANX
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admin
Posted on Saturday, April 24, 2004 - 12:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Why don't you put a soldered seam copper or stainless roof on it?
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Anonymous
Posted on Thursday, May 06, 2004 - 09:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I power washed an asbestos tile roof, 3 ft by 6 ft sheets of asbestos. I was left with a residue on the ground that had some fibers in it and a clean roof.I don't know if I have created a major problem. Do I need to seal the asbestos...it feels smooth and nothing visible is washing off of it. Do I need to remove 20 plus yards of pea gravel surrounding the building? I have removed the deposits of gray silt like material. I would appreciate any help that can be offered.
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M. C.
Posted on Thursday, May 13, 2004 - 10:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

5 TO 6 HUNDRED 16IN SHINGLES AND SOME RIDGE CAP FOR SALE
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jimmy
Posted on Friday, May 14, 2004 - 10:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

HI-
I am looking for a contractor with asbestos roof repair experience in the ny metro area. We have diamond shaped gray asbestoos shingles - probably 70+ years old but not sure, some leaks. We want to convert the attic but need to deal with the roof or the work inside will be ruined. The old roof does not have sheathing but 1 by 1s or so. I wish there was a way to remove and then replace the roof after installing sheathing

If anyone has any ideas or experience with a similar situation or a lead on a contractor we greatly appreciate your help.

thanks
jimmy

p.s. thanks for a great website
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Casey Dean
Posted on Sunday, May 16, 2004 - 08:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We have a gray diamond shape asbestos tile roof. It is original to the house which was built in 1904 and is in excellent condition overall. We are noticing areas of a reddish/orange color and wonder is this is a fungus or mold or something. How do we get rid of it, prevent it, etc?
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Michael Dreiling
Posted on Thursday, May 27, 2004 - 01:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have been looking for someone to repair my asbestos roof in Central Ohio. It is in good condition but needs some repair. I have been contacted by a Mr Clean Pressure Washing which has proposed cleaning the roof, then repairing it then coating the asbestos tiles with a sealant (specially designed for asbestos roof tiles). Has any one heard of this company or a similar process?
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admin
Posted on Friday, May 28, 2004 - 11:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would be very surprised if there were a sealant specially designed for asbestos roof tiles. For one, asbestos tiles do not need sealed. They're also an obsolete material - no longer manufactured - so why would anyone manufacture a sealant for them? I would urge caution in letting anyone work on your asbestos roof unless they have experience with asbestos roof tiles and know exactly what they're doing. Asbestos tiles are fragile and will crack under foot pressure (for example - possibly uinder a pressure wash, too). Then try to find replacement tiles, or someone who knows how to replace the tiles. A word to the wise.

Joe Jenkins
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Chuck Bruzee
Posted on Saturday, June 05, 2004 - 04:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

own an older home with the diamond shaped asbestos shingles on it. We have recently had our home painted and had to remove the old gutters to repair and paint
the fascia
We have contacted several gutter people to replace the gutters and have gotten 2 conflicting views as to how to attach the new gutters. The first company wants to nail thru the asbestos shingles and "strap" the gutters to the roof.The second company has suggested adding even more wood to the fascia and nail or spiking into that.
Niether company has suggested what I think is right. That being to lift the shingles on the edge and nail thru or into the cedar shake shingle underneath.
Any information you can add would be very much appreciated.Also ,I live in central New York...The finger lakes area(between Rochester and Syracuse) having trouble finding a contractor willing and able to repair several other problems with this roof.
Thank You for your time on this matter.
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admin
Posted on Saturday, June 05, 2004 - 05:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Nailing through the tiles and using strap hangers for gutters is one common way asbestos roofs are seriously damaged. That is not a good option for an asbestos roof. Try fascia hangers, which may require the addition of extra wood.
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Anonymous
Posted on Monday, June 28, 2004 - 11:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

does moss/mildew growing on an asbestos tile roof mean the tiles are shot? If I add a copper ridge strip to "wash" the roof will eliminating the moss create more of a problem than it solves?
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admin
Posted on Monday, June 28, 2004 - 01:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Moss does not mean the roof is shot. You can scrape it off and the tiles underneath are still good. Copper ridge will not necessarily keep moss off, especially when there are factors encouraging moss growth such as overhanging trees. You might be better off spraying your moss with a copper oxide wash as can be bought at Agway or other farm supply store. It's used as an orchard spray or an aglaecide. It's probably advisable to keep people off your roof if possible unless they know what they're doing.
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Kim & Ben
Posted on Monday, June 28, 2004 - 07:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We are considering the purchase of a home in western PA (area near where Joe is located) that has an existing asbestos roof of the side lap variety. We are hesitant since it is the original roof and the home was built in 1929. The house is in very good condition. The roof has been checked and a certification was given by a roofing company signifying that there are no cracks. It appears to me when looking at the roof from the ground that a few of the shingles are lifting on the one side. I am also not sure that the roofing company handles asbestos, and am leary since the homeowners have paid to get this done on their own. I realize I still need a qualified person to inspect it, and am looking for a suggestion of whom to call, and would also like answers to some questions. The cost of replacing the entire roof in 10 to 15 years would deter us from purchasing, due to the costly proceedure. Please post ASAP. Any help and/or advise will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
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Joe Jenkins (Admin)
Posted on Tuesday, June 29, 2004 - 02:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Where is the roof located?
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Kim & Ben
Posted on Tuesday, June 29, 2004 - 05:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The roof covers the entire home in Butler, PA. I might also need to add that there is evidence of bats in the attic. It looks like they are getting in through the side ventilation. Thanks for the quick reply. Kim
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Michael Dreiling
Posted on Thursday, July 01, 2004 - 01:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is it reasonable to power-wash off the moss on the North side of the asbestos roof?

Is there or was there a coating originally covering the asbestos roofing tiles? The proposed
coating is intended to restore the color and texture of an original tile. This is the page on his site where he describes the process

http://www.mrcleanpressurewashing.com/asbestos2549.html
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Sharon and Jeremy
Posted on Tuesday, September 28, 2004 - 01:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We have recently purchased a home in New Orleans, with an asbestos shingle roof, aged 50+ years. Our home inspector estimated the roof had another 5-10 years, but with the condition that it receives regular repairs yearly and that there be 'proper ventilation' as well. After reconsidering this report, we're leaning towards replacing the roof before we move in, rather than risking contamination by hurricane damage or some such while we're living there.

Couple questions: What are the chances of residual contamination after the removal is done? Is there a way to test for traces in the air or on the ground? Also, is there a way to salvage any of the shingles during the removal, and if so, would you know of someone to purchase them? Lastly, can anyone recommend a contractor in the New Orleans area?

Thanks.
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Steve Singleton
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 04:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My 1939 vintage side lap asbestos roof leaks in a couple of places where cracked or broken tiles appear. Rather than just replacing the broken tiles, however, my roofer advises removing all of them, installing new underlayment, and then relaying the tiles, at a cost of $13.5K, which doesn't include the unknown cost for replacement tiles. His rationale for not simply replacing cracked tiles is that a) new underlayment is needed to protect the sheathing from condensation when moist attic air contacts cold tiles; and b) tile cracks are sometimes invisible and moisture can seep through and travel, making it hard to pinpoint the source of leaks.

It would be nice to have a long-term solution, but not at the cost of sending a kid through a year of college. Replacing individual shingles rather than the whole roof would be much, much cheaper. Is that really such a bad option?
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Anonymous
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 06:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

No - Replace the broken tiles - If at some point you need a new roof- which may not be in your lifetime - I would not re-install asbestos roofing of any type.. get bids for slate - metal - tile - or even shingles -maintain the roof you have now and put the rest of your money towards college.
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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, October 26, 2004 - 03:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

anonymous is correct except, when he says you may not need new underlayment in certain areas-- you may. You see side lap roofs in areas where the exposed side of the tile is towards a valley underlayment does play a (vital) role. In areas of the feild (no obstructions) you do not need to be as concerned about the underlayment. and this would only be in Northern areas where you get snow build-up would you have to worry about the underlayment. tile on!
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admin
Posted on Tuesday, October 26, 2004 - 05:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Replace the broken or cracked tiles. Use a ripper to get the old tiles out and stainless steel slate hooks to put the new ones in. It's an easy job. Make sure the roofer is working off a hook ladder or a roof ladder and not walking on the roof.
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James Johannes
Posted on Saturday, December 04, 2004 - 07:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In a message above One person asked this: I have been looking for someone to repair my asbestos roof in Central Ohio. It is in good condition but needs some repair. I have been contacted by a Mr Clean Pressure Washing which has proposed cleaning the roof, then repairing it then coating the asbestos tiles with a sealant (specially designed for asbestos roof tiles). Has any one heard of this company or a similar process?

The reply to this was:I would be very surprised if there were a sealant specially designed for asbestos roof tiles. For one, asbestos tiles do not need sealed. They're also an obsolete material - no longer manufactured - so why would anyone manufacture a sealant for them? I would urge caution in letting anyone work on your asbestos roof unless they have experience with asbestos roof tiles and know exactly what they're doing. Asbestos tiles are fragile and will crack under foot pressure (for example - possibly uinder a pressure wash, too). Then try to find replacement tiles, or someone who knows how to replace the tiles. A word to the wise.

Joe Jenkins

My name is Mr. Johannes of the Mr. Clean company, we have been restoring and re-coating asbestos roofs for years. We replace broken peices with real asbestos roofing and we have a coating that we warrant for up to 30 years. We have been in business for 25 1/2 years and in that time, we've never had a complaint with the (BBB). We are located in Columbus Ohio. (Michael Dreiling) in the memo above, had us restore his roof I wont say a thing, just go to his link and ask him what he thinks now.(mdreilin@columbus.rr.com)or you can also go to one of our link to see what we do to all different types of roofing, including the asbestos. http://mrcleanpressurewashing.com/roofing.html
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admin
Posted on Sunday, December 05, 2004 - 05:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What is the coating?
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1roofpro
Posted on Sunday, December 05, 2004 - 06:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

mr. clean,
i have to admit the pics look nice, but i've replaced more than a few cedar roofs cause the owners were talked into powerwashing them earlier. i can only think it would have the same effect on asbestos or older slate. please share some info on the coatings used.
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James Johannes
Posted on Tuesday, December 07, 2004 - 04:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

First thing about your coment on cedar shakes: There are to many people in the pressure washing business that don't know what there doing. Some shake roofs are to far gone to save and anyone trying to clean them should first know when and when not to. You can see pictures of every kind of roofing at our roofing page. (mrcleanpressurewashing.com/roofing.html)
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James Johannes
Posted on Tuesday, December 07, 2004 - 05:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Asbestos coating: Years and years ago we cleaned asbestos roofing and within a few years, the customers were back to square one. After researching the product (asbestos), we found that it had a protective coating on it from the factory. We tried painting it and discovered it would peel within a year. We got with a few national companies to test another way and we came up with a bonding agent and new coating. It not only works, but we have never had a problem out of it yet. We started testing the product in the early 1980's and it has now been on asbestos roofing for about twenty years. You will never see it in a store. There are too many details in the preparation before it's used and the temperature, along with humidity, play a large factor in applying it correctly. Like our website states: "We will travel anywhere in the continental United States to refurbish and coat asbestos roofing". If anyone would like to see the process, go to one of our web pages to veiw it. (http://www.mrcleanpressurewashing.com/roofing.html}and click on one of the asbestos pictures.
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SPENCER P.
Posted on Tuesday, December 07, 2004 - 07:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Most of your pictures are blurry. My company has (at the customers request) power washed a few asbestos and slate roofs through the years but, we've never applied a coating (on asbestos or slate) because we did not know of any and didn't want to be fraudulant. If you've got a good product why not share it with us? That is what this site is all about, professionals helping each other. You may not agree with every one's ideas or practices but we all gladly share are persoanal perspectives with each other. We also share information on products, materials and our personal experience on these. Just a thought SPENCER P.
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james Johannes
Posted on Thursday, December 09, 2004 - 10:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

SPENCER P:We did try to let others use our product years ago, they weren't doing things in the correct way. First of all just pressure washing a roof is not a good ideal, it needs to be done with with a level of steam and a lower pressure and the tempature, humidity, sunlight and the time of day has to be correct, falure of the correct weather conditions will make our product fail. Two other companies tried to use our product. they didn't clean it right, they had the wrong temp and they applied it incorrectly. We have never had a customer complaint on our product or what we do and we keep it that way. Also if you just pressure wash a roof it will be right back to sqaure one in about two or three years. I don't mean to be rude, It's just that I have researched and tested everything for so many years, we want to keep it a good product and the only way we have found to do so is,not to retail it.
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SPENCER P.
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 06:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So what happens when you can no longer perform this work? does the product die! Also you must not have found the most competant companies to work with or they would have followed the instructions, and not just looked at making $. My customers mean alot to our company so, that would never happen. Also not to sound rude either, and I sincerely mean that but, there are other competant companies that given the opertunity could make the (your) product work just as good as your company can. Given they are trained and exposed to such a product. But, on the other hand I can see you not allowing everyone to have access to it. Do some research on the people (company(s)) that are asking for information on this product and chose the best one so other asbestos roof owners can enjoy ther roofs--again. Again only a disscusion and this is my opinion. Not everyone that visits this site is a true professional slate roofers and i'm sure some slate roofing has been done wrong but Joe (thanks Joe) keeps this site open and he will and other professional slate roofers who join in on thissite will try to help anyone to do the job as correct as possible-they never turn a deaf ear. All i'm saying is maybe, just maybe you'll find the right person and company to share this valuable tool with. Stay open minded. P.S. No I do not wish to do this for a living I am a slate roof professional but, i'm sure there are others who would like to know about this product.
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James Johannes
Posted on Saturday, December 11, 2004 - 12:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sorry but I have seen to many people do wrong. The main thing we have also done for years is the pressure washing and since Home Depot started selling pressure washers "cause it's a good ideal" People are out there miss leading others and ripping them off on cleaning. I can't compete with the people doing it for $99.00 and they aren't even really cleaning but they are putting it the general publics heads that, that is what it should cost to clean an average house. Basically I don't want my coatings and I emphasize "MY COATING" out there as a $99.00 thing to do and have it all messed up. Try this, we are located in Columbus Ohio, call the (BBB) here and ask them about us. I have had my company here for over 25 years now and NEVER had a complaint. I'm really not much of a businessman but I sure know everything I tell or do for people. If you ever have an asbestos roof and you want it done I would be glad to help, just sub it out to us and I assure you it will out last any other work you have seen on asbestos.
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c russell
Posted on Wednesday, January 19, 2005 - 03:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am looking for some asbestos tiles as I am repairing my roof in the Jacksonville Beach, Florida area. My tiles are JM blue gray 16inch square with one corner cut at an angle. I have found some in the area but all are different color so would like some the same color.
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Terry
Posted on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 - 01:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

C Russell: you should check out the links on this page to: http://www.mrcleanpressurewashing.com/asbestosroofingmainpage.html there are a few other people on this message board that had the color coating applied and it is amazing when it is done. You can also pick any color or colors for your roof to be.
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David & Susan Neal
Posted on Tuesday, February 15, 2005 - 02:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My husband & I have purchased and are renovating an older home (built in 1930) with an asbestos-tile roof that's original to home. We are looking for a skilled craftsman in the Houston, Texas area (we're centrally located in Med Center) that can properly replace broken & missing tiles. We want to restore the roof, definitely not replace it. Someone who uses the proper techniques outlined in Joe Jenkins website. We've spoken to Jim Johannes with Mr. Clean Pressure Washing in Ohio who is willing to travel but we'd like to get some bids from local contractors (in part because we don't have the almost $1K travel honorarium required by a traveling roofer) and I'm not really looking to coat/seal my roof. Maybe pressure wash it but for right now - really just properly repair it. Any suggestions other than looking in the yellow pages? Thanks for the help.
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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, February 15, 2005 - 02:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Call 972-446-0005, Located in Carrollton,Texas, The Roof Slate & Tile Co.
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David & Susan Neal
Posted on Friday, March 18, 2005 - 12:50 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

TILES NEEDED: 8 inches wide X 16 inches tall Asbestos Tiles. Graduated thickness from 3/16 inch at top (nailed edge) to 1/4 inch at bottom/butt. Light gray color with a "wood grain" texture. Anyone have any of these? Please email me at sneal@fpchouston.org. Thank you.
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Jack Fletcher
Posted on Thursday, June 30, 2005 - 04:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am e-mailing from Trenton, NJ. I am a member of the property committee at my church and was called to look at some leaks in our building. The roof that is on the building presently is slate and some tiles are missing and others look pretty bad. How can I tell if the roof should be repaired or replaced? Thank you.
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admin
Posted on Sunday, July 03, 2005 - 03:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Get a copy of the slate roof bible (http://www.slateroofcentral.com/store_books.html#srb). Is the roof slate or is it asbestos? Go to http://www.slateroofcentral.com/identify.html and http://www.slateroofcentral.com/photos_asbestos.htm

Joe Jenkins
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michelle campbell
Posted on Wednesday, July 13, 2005 - 05:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've recently taken a close up look of the asbestos tiles on our roof and now I'm scared! They actually appear fuzzy; you can see the fibers on the surface. All these years I thought they were supposed to be light grey and sort of rough. Now I have seen the edges of the tiles that have been under cover forever and I see that the original surface was smooth almost glossy dark grey. Looking at the dirt in the gutter, I think I can see fibers. All these years I've followed the general rule "if it ain't broke don't fix it" which still seeems to be the standard recommendation for asbestos roof tiles. I'm starting to imagine my entire home and yard contaminated as fibers wash down the gutter. What do you think of the condition of my tiles?
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Walter Musson
Posted on Wednesday, July 13, 2005 - 06:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes,they are most likely losing fibers every time it rains.It is probably time to begin investigating how to proceed with a new roof.
In some States their DEP regulates how this can be removed and it's proper disposal.
Start talking to some agencies to see what standards must be met-then search out competent parties to provide quotes.
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T Rankin
Posted on Thursday, July 28, 2005 - 11:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have a project with several buildings roofed in corrugated asbestos roof panels. The owner wants to powerwash them to remove dirt. The contractor has raised the concern that powerwashing these panels will cause the asbestos to become friable. Is this true?
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tcaine
Posted on Friday, July 29, 2005 - 04:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Am looking to buy25asbestos roofing tiles in order to repair an existing roof.
Please e-mail me at ytyt86l@comcast.net. The figure after the 6 is a lower case "L".
Thank you.
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Saturday, July 30, 2005 - 10:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

T Rankin: the contractor is probably right.

tcaine: go to http://jenkinsslate.com/asbestos-tiles.html
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Andrew Robinson
Posted on Monday, November 07, 2005 - 11:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

When replacing an asbestos roof, does the contractor have to go trough the normal asbestos abatement procedures (tenting, ventillation,etc)?

Thanks,

Andrew Robinson

Leo was a big help, Thanks
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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, November 08, 2005 - 11:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well that is certainly a GREAT question. However I do believe you should contact the agencies in your area to be 100% sure of the local and State law where you live. You do not want to get into a legal case with this asbestos stuff. I personally know of a man who went to prison for 7yrs. for "illegally" removing asbestos. It was pipe wrapping asbestos and a disgruntled employee turned him in for illegally removal and disposal. What he removed and disposed of amounted to about three grocery bags, alot less than a roof would have. From what I know asbestos is alright left alone, it's when you disturb it and cause dusting and flaking which you certainly would when tearing off a complete asbestos roof. So before you or a contractor (if your not the contractor) gets into ALOT OF TROUBLE I would check with your local and State agencies to find out from them. Better safe than sorry, really sorry.
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Joe Jenkins (Admin)
Posted on Friday, November 11, 2005 - 11:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think a home-owner can remove his or her own asbestos roof, or a self-employed contractor can do so, but an *employer* has to provide all the protections for his/her *employees*, including respiratory protection (i.e. moon suits), etc. If there are neighbors nearby, they could complain about the potential danger of asbestos in the air and then you're screwed. You can remove asbestos shingles without breaking them, so removing the shingles is not necessarily a hazard.
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Jon P
Posted on Monday, November 21, 2005 - 11:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What wind speeds are asbestos tiles capable of resisting (assuming they are installed properly)? I am working on a project in Galveston, Texas where the current code calls for a roof cover system that is cable of resisting a 130-mph 3-second gust wind. The owner would like to repair approximately one square of damaged asbestos tile with undamaged tile that had been stored over thee years.
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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, January 24, 2006 - 02:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you want to get your asbestos roof reconditioned, go here http://www.asbestos1.com and checkout what they do and they give warranties. They can make an asbestos roof out-last a slate roof.
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Anonymous
Posted on Wednesday, January 25, 2006 - 12:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Your pictures are terrible. I hope your not trying to impress us with those photos! And as for an asbestos tile roof lasting 600 years well, come on atleast be alittle believeable. 600 years? Are you serious? NO WAY.
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Jim
Posted on Tuesday, February 07, 2006 - 11:42 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

True, some of the pictures aren't of great quality, never said we could take a picture but, we sure do know asbestos roofing. Think of it this way (anything that gets wet and sits in the sun light will oxidize and deteriorate but, if you bring it in and out of the weather it collects dust. In the way a slate will last for a few hundred years but, think about how long it was in the ground before it got to that roof. If you re-coat an asbestos roof when needed, it stays out of the weather. By maintaining it when needed it could last longer.
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LA Contractor
Posted on Sunday, March 12, 2006 - 02:48 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Licensed and Insured contractor in New Orleans area currently performing specialty roof repairs. Have asbestos tiles (multiple styles) stocked in abundance. If you are in need of an asbestos roof repair or know someone who is, please contact me via e-mail. Company staff includes prior insurance adjusters who have years of experience in consulting property loss insurance claims for property owners, so concern about proper insurance allotment of funds to get the job done right is obsolete. We are ready to assist,and looking foward to speaking with you.
Thanks,
Randall Bryant
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Anonymous
Posted on Friday, May 12, 2006 - 12:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What is the best way to clean a slate roof that has moss growing on it? Thanks!
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Anonymous
Posted on Friday, May 12, 2006 - 04:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A slate roof really doesn't need cleaning. It is a personnel preference only. But, we power wash needed cleaning area, with low to medium pressure only. Makes it alot cleaner and customers are happy. Really can't do this to a PA. slate; slate roof. You should inform your customers that it may NOT all come off (the moss). Just best as possible without causing damage. Also watch for blowing the water up against the slate--be smart start at the top and work down.
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Anonymous
Posted on Friday, May 12, 2006 - 04:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Make sure you have the roof set up (for safety) correctly as these slate roofs get Reeeal (real) slippery when water is applied.
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christie cunningham
Posted on Sunday, June 25, 2006 - 06:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just researched a home built in 1986 and the roof is described as corrugated asbestos. What should that mean for us as possible purchasers of the house?
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Anonymous
Posted on Monday, June 26, 2006 - 12:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well, it's a good roof UNTOUCHED but, if it were to ever need repair you'd have to do some research to find a contractor and materials. Keep this web site address, it may help you in the future. Use the roof as a bad point to the house so maybe you can reduce the price some.

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